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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Dynamic Interaction Between Two Fluid-Filled Circular Pipelines in Saturated Poroelastic Medium Subjected to Harmonic Waves

[+] Author and Article Information
Xue-Qian Fang

Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Shijiazhuang Tiedao University,
Shijiazhuang 050043, China
e-mail: stduxfang@yeah.net

Shao-Pu Yang

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shijiazhuang Tiedao University,
Shijiazhuang 050043, China

Jin-Xi Liu, Wen-Jie Feng

Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Shijiazhuang Tiedao University,
Shijiazhuang 050043, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received November 4, 2013; final manuscript received March 17, 2014; published online October 13, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Jong Chull Jo.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 137(1), 011305 (Oct 13, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: PVT-13-1191; doi: 10.1115/1.4027244 History: Received November 04, 2013; Revised March 17, 2014

A semi-analytical method is developed to investigate the dynamic interaction of two fluid-filled circular pipelines in a porous elastic fluid-saturated medium subjected to harmonic plane waves. The harmonic equations based on Biot's theory are reduced by Helmholtz decomposition theorem. The potentials in the fluid-saturated medium, in the linings, and inside the pipelines are expressed by wave function expansion method. The addition theorem for cylindrical wave functions is employed to obtain the closed-form solution in the form of infinite series. The hoop stress amplitudes around the pipelines are evaluated and discussed for the representative values of parameters characterizing the model. The effects of the proximity of two pipelines, the geometrical and material properties of linings, and the incident wave frequency on the dynamic stress around the pipelines are examined.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Topics: Fluids , Waves , Pipelines , Stress
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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Geometry of the problem

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Distribution of DSCF around the first pipeline with α = 0, ω = 10 Hz,a* = 1.05,T* = 5.0, (1) b* = 10.0 obtained from this paper; (2) b* = 10.0 obtained from Zhou et al. [11]; (3) b* = 2.5

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Distribution of DSCF around the first pipeline with α = 0, ω = 10 Hz,a* = 1.05,T* = 5.0, b* = 2.5. (1) Obtained from this paper without fluid in the pipelines; (2) obtained from ABAQUS without fluid in the pipelines; (3) obtained from this paper with fluid filled in the pipelines

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Distribution of DSCF around the first pipeline with α = 0, ω = 100 Hz, a* = 1.05, T* = 5.0, (1) b* = 10.0; (2) b* = 2.5

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Distribution of DSCF around the first pipeline with α = 0, ω = 500 Hz, a* = 1.05,T* = 5.0, (1) b* = 10.0; (2) b* = 2.5

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Distribution of DSCF around the first pipeline with α = 0, ω = 100 Hz, a* = 1.01,T* = 5.0, (1) b* = 10.0; (2) b* = 2.5

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Distribution of DSCF around the first pipeline with α = 0, ω = 100 Hz, a* = 1.01, T* = 15.0, (1) b* = 10.0; (2) b* = 2.5

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Distribution of DSCF around the first pipeline with ω = 100 Hz, a* = 1.01, T* = 10.0, b* = 2.5, (1) α = 5π/4; (2) 3π/2

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