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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

A Review of State-of-the-Art Methods for Pressure Vessels Design Against Progressive Deformation

[+] Author and Article Information
Philippe Rohart

CETIM—Centre Technique des
Industries Mécaniques,
52, avenue Felix Louat—BP 80067,
Senlis Cedex F 60304, France;
Polymers and Composites Technology and
Mechanical Engineering Department,
École des Mines de Douai,
941 rue Charles Bourseul—BP 10038,
Douai Cedex F59508, France;
Université des Sciences et Technologies Lille1,
Cité Scientifique,
Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex 59655, France
e-mail: philippe.rohart@cetim.fr

Stéphane Panier, Saïd Hariri

Polymers and Composites Technology and
Mechanical Engineering Department,
École des Mines de Douai,
941 rue Charles Bourseul—BP 10038,
Douai Cedex F59508, France;
Université des Sciences et Technologies Lille1,
Cité Scientifique,
Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex 59655, France

Yves Simonet, Mansour Afzali

CETIM—Centre Technique des
Industries Mécaniques,
52, avenue Felix Louat—BP 80067,
Senlis Cedex F 60304, France

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received September 17, 2013; final manuscript received November 4, 2014; published online February 24, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Allen C. Smith.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 137(5), 051202 (Oct 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: PVT-13-1164; doi: 10.1115/1.4029095 History: Received September 17, 2013; Revised November 04, 2014; Online February 24, 2015

Progressive plastic deformation is one of the damage mechanisms which can occur in pressure vessels subjected to cyclic loading. For design applications, the main rule proposed by codes against this failure mode is the so-called 3f (or 3Sm) criterion. During the last decade, studies have shown that this condition can be unreliable, and its application should be restricted. In parallel, theoretical developments enabled shakedown analyses to be considered in design methodology, and to be incorporated in codes and standards (EN13445, CODAP) from the early 2000s. This paper gives a review of innovative methods based on shakedown theory, which can be used in the determination of elastic shakedown limits, ratchet limits, or cyclic steady state. These approaches are based on different concepts, such as elastic compensation linear matching method (LMM), Gokhfeld theory (uniform modified yield, load dependent yield modification (LDYM)), or the research of stabilized cycle direct cyclic analysis (DCA). Each method is presented and applied on a Benchmark example in abaqus, and results are compared. A final assessment focuses on computation time, and underlines the benefits that could be expected for industrial applications.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 2

Supporting line segments definition [4]

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Fig. 1

Different behaviors under cyclic loading [3]

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Fig. 3

Fictitious yield surface defined by Gockfeld concept [9]

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Fig. 4

Fictitious yield surface defined by LDYM method [9]

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Application of cyclic thermal loading on classical bree problem

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Fig. 8

Computation time obtained with different design methodologies

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Fig. 6

Geometry and mesh used for classical bree problem

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Fig. 7

Ratchet limits obtained with different design methodologies

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Fig. 9

Geometry of case 2 [15]

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Fig. 11

Ratchet limits obtained with different design methodologies

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Fig. 12

Computation time obtained with different design methodologies

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Fig. 10

Geometry of mesh of thin-walled cylinder–cylinder intersection

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