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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Effect of Dissimilar Leading Edges on the Flow Structures Around a Square Cylinder

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Ajith Kumar

Professor
Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Amrita University,
Amritapuri Campus,
Kollam, Kerala, India
e-mail: amritanjali.ajith@gmail.com;
r_ajithkumar@am.amrita.edu

K. Arunkumar

Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Amrita University,
Amritapuri Campus,
Kollam, Kerala, India
e-mail: akmallasseril@gmail.com

C. M. Hariprasad

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Amrita University,
Amritapuri Campus,
Kollam, Kerala, India
e-mail: hariology@yahoo.co.in

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 15, 2014; final manuscript received January 17, 2015; published online April 16, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Jong Chull Jo.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 137(6), 061301 (Dec 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: PVT-14-1132; doi: 10.1115/1.4029656 History: Received August 15, 2014; Revised January 17, 2015; Online April 16, 2015

In the present study, results of a flow visualization study on the flow around a square cylinder with dissimilar leading edges are presented. The radii of the leading edges of the cylinder “r1” and “r2” are such that the ratio r1/r2 is systematically varied from 0 to 1. The flow structures around the cylinder with different leading edge radii particularly the vortex shedding mode and mechanism are investigated. For studies with stationary as well as oscillated cylinder cases, the results are taken at a Reynolds number value of 2100. For the oscillated case, a special mechanism is made to oscillate the cylinders at a desired amplitude and frequency. That is, the cylinder undergoes forced oscillation in this case. Results indicate that dissimilar leading edges bring notable changes in the near-wake flow structures of a square cylinder. For the stationary cylinder cases, the vortex formation length decreases with increase in the r1/r2 ratio. Flow structures are also found to be influenced by the amplitude ratio (amplitude to body size ratio); the higher the amplitude, the larger the size of vortices shed per cycle of cylinder oscillation. In view of marine structures and building sections with similar geometries, the present results carry considerable practical significance.

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References

Ajith Kumar, R., and Gowda, B. H. L., 2006, “Flow-Induced Vibration of a Square Cylinder Without and With Interference,” J. Fluids Struct., 22(3), pp. 345–369. [CrossRef]
Luo, S. C., 1992, “Vortex Wake of a Transversely Oscillating Square Cylinder: A Flow Visualization Analysis,” J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn., 45(1), pp. 97–119. [CrossRef]
Kawai, H., 1998, “Effect of Corner Modifications on Aeroelastic Instabilities of Tall Buildings,” J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn., 74–76, pp. 719–729. [CrossRef]
Dwyer, H. A., and McCroskey, W. J., 1973, “Oscillating Flow Over a Cylinder at Large Reynolds Number,” J. Fluid Mech., 61(4), pp. 753–767. [CrossRef]
Bearman, P. W., 1984, “Vortex Shedding From Oscillating Bluff Bodies,” Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., 16(1), pp. 195–222. [CrossRef]
Griffin, O. M., and Ramberg, S. E., 1974, “The Vortex-Street Wakes of Vibrating Cylinders,” J. Fluid Mech., 66(3), pp. 553–576. [CrossRef]
Ajith Kumar, R., Sohn, C. H., and Gowda, B. H. L., 2009, “Influence of Corner Radius on the Near Wake Structure of a Transversely Oscillating Square Cylinder,” J. Mech. Sci. Technol., 23(9), pp. 2390–2416. [CrossRef]
Hu, J. C., Zhou, Y., and Dalton, C., 2006, “Effects of the Corner Radius on the Near Wake of a Square Prism,” Exp. Fluids, 40(1), pp. 106–118. [CrossRef]
Luo, S. C., Yazdani, Md. G., Chew, Y. T., and Lee, T. S., 1994, “Effects of Incidence and Afterbody Shape on Flow Past Bluff Cylinders,” J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn., 53(3), pp. 375–399. [CrossRef]
Krishnamoorthy, S., Price, S. J., and Paidoussis, M. P., 2001, “Cross Flow Past an Oscillating Circular Cylinder: Synchronization Phenomenon in the Near Wake,” J. Fluids Struct., 15(7), pp. 955–980. [CrossRef]
Bearman, P. W., 1965, “Investigation of the Flow Behind a Two-Dimensional Model With a Blunt Trailing Edge and Fitted With Splitter Plates,” J. Fluid Mech., 21(2), pp. 241–255. [CrossRef]
Bearman, P. W., 1967, “On Vortex Street Wakes,” J. Fluid Mech., 28(4), pp. 625–641. [CrossRef]
Gerrard, J. H., 1966, “The Mechanics of the Formation Region of Vortices Behind Bluff Bodies,” J. Fluid. Mech., 25(2), pp. 401–413. [CrossRef]
Bostok, B. R., and Mair, W. A., 1972, “Pressure Distributions and Forces on Rectangular and D-Shaped Cylinders,” Aeronaut. Q., 23, pp. 1–6.

Figures

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Fig. 1

Flow visualization water channel (dimensions are in mm)

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Fig. 2

Slider-crank mechanism

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Fig. 3

Geometry details (B = 30 mm)

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Fig. 4

Flow fields around stationary cylinders N (a) 0.0, (b) 0.25, (c) 0.5, (d) 0.75, and (e) 1.0

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Fig. 5

Flow structure showing primary and secondary vortices (stationary cylinder case)

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Fig. 6

Strouhal number versus radius ratio (stationary cylinder case)

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Fig. 7

Flow over an isolated circular cylinder (Re = 2100); flow is from left to right

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Fig. 8

CD, Гs versus radius ratio (stationary cylinder case)

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Fig. 9

Flow structures for r1/r2 = 0.0 (A/B = 0.8; fe/fs = 1) (a) 0.000 TDC, (b) 0.071, (c) 0.146, (d) 0.214, (e) 0.357, (f) 0.429 ∼ BDC, (g) 0.75, (h) 0.928, and (i) 1.0 TDC

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Fig. 10

Flow structures for r1/r2 = 0.25 (A/B = 0.8; fe/fs = 1) (a) 0.000 TDC, (b) 0.100, (c) 0.25, (d) 0.350, (e) 0.455 ∼BDC, (f) 0.550, and (g) 1.000 TDC

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Fig. 11

Flow structures for r1/r2 = 0.5 (A/B = 0.8; fe/fs = 1) (a) 0.000, (b) 0.077, (c) 0.151, (d) 0.25, (e) 0.332, (f) 0.369, (g) 0.406, (h) 0.553, (i) 0.75, (j) 0.852, and (k) 1.000 TDC

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Fig. 12

Flow structures for r1/r2 = 0.75 (A/B = 0.8; fe/fs = 1) (a) 0.000 TDC, (b) 0.100, (c) 0.149, (d) 0.204, (e) 0.652, (f) 0.75, and (g) 1.000 TDC

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Fig. 13

Flow structures for r1/r2 = 1.0 (A/B = 0.8; fe/fs = 1) (a) 0.000 TDC, (b) 0.120, (c) 0.25, (d) 0.496, (e) 0.579, (f) 0.75, and (g) 1.000 TDC

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Fig. 14

Flow structures for A/B = 0.3 (r1/r2 = 0.0; fe/fs=1) (a) 0.000 TDC, (b) 0.110, (c) 0.210, (d) 0.526, (e) 0.689, (f) 0.789, (g) 0.900, (h) 1.0 TDC

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Fig. 15

Flow structures for A/B = 1.2 (r1/r2 = 0.0; fe/fs = 1) (a) 0.000 TDC, (b) 0.071, (c) 0.218, (d) 0.321, (e) 0.429 ∼ BDC, (f) 0.643, (g) 0.714, (h) 0.896, and (i) 1.0 TDC

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Fig. 16

Vortex size versus amplitude ratio

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Fig. 17

Vortex size versus radius ratio

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