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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Hydrostatic Implosion of GFRP Composite Tubes Studied by Digital Image Correlation

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael Pinto

Dynamics Photo-Mechanics Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical, Industrial
and Systems Engineering,
University of Rhode Island,
Kingston, RI 02881
e-mail: mapinto@my.uri.edu

Sachin Gupta

Dynamics Photo-Mechanics Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical, Industrial
and Systems Engineering,
University of Rhode Island,
Kingston, RI 02881
e-mail: gupsac@my.uri.edu

Arun Shukla

Dynamics Photo-Mechanics Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical, Industrial
and Systems Engineering,
University of Rhode Island,
Kingston, RI 02881
e-mail: shuklaa@egr.uri.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received September 9, 2014; final manuscript received January 15, 2015; published online February 27, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Pierre Mertiny.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 137(5), 051302 (Oct 01, 2015) (12 pages) Paper No: PVT-14-1145; doi: 10.1115/1.4029657 History: Received September 09, 2014; Revised January 15, 2015; Online February 27, 2015

The mechanisms and pressure fields associated with the hydrostatic implosion of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tubes with varying reinforcement are investigated using high-speed photography. Experiments are conducted in a large pressure vessel, designed to provide constant hydrostatic pressure throughout collapse. Three-dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) is used to capture full-field displacements, and dynamic pressure transducers measure the pressure pulse generated by the collapse. Results show that braided GFRP tubes release pressure waves with significantly greater impulse upon collapse as compared to filament-wound tubes, increasing their damage potential.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Experimental apparatus (left) and specimen configuration (right)

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Fig. 2

Calibration experiment for 3D DIC of submerged structures

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Fig. 3

Calibration results for out-of-plane and in-plane translation: (a) out-of-plane displacement and measurement error estimates and (b) in-plane displacement and measurement error estimates

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Fig. 4

Example of radius reconstruction of submerged RT composite tube

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Fig. 5

Average dynamic pressure measure about the midspan of RT specimens

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Fig. 6

High-speed photographs of key events for RT specimens

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Fig. 7

DIC contours of radial displacement (left) and velocity (right) for RT specimens

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Fig. 8

Postmortem images for glass/PE specimens, showing (a) matrix cracking, (b) delamination of outer hoop ply, (c) delamination of inner helical ply, and (d) long pulled-out glass fibers

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Fig. 9

Average dynamic pressure measure about the midspan of GT specimens

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Fig. 10

High-speed photographs of key events for GT specimens

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Fig. 11

DIC contours of radial displacement (left) and velocity (right) for GT specimens

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Fig. 12

Postmortem images of GT specimens, showing (a) longitudinal cracking, (c) internal delamination, and (c) matrix cracking in the innermost ply

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Fig. 13

Average dynamic pressure measure about the midspan of BG specimens

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Fig. 14

High-speed photographs of key events for BG specimens

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Fig. 15

DIC contours of radial displacement (left) and velocity (right) for BG specimens

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Fig. 16

Postmortem images of BG specimens, showing (a) longitudinal cracking and (b) internal delamination

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Fig. 17

Wavelet analysis of wound and braided GFRP tubes of similar geometry. Colors represent scaled power levels: (a) scalogram and matched pressure history for typical RT specimen and (b) scalogram and matched pressure history for typical BG specimen.

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