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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Effect of Specimen Geometry on the Predicted Mechanical Behavior of Polyethylene Pipe Material1

[+] Author and Article Information
Tarek M. A. A. EL-Bagory

Assistant Professor
Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering Department,
Engineering College,
Majmaah University,
P.O.Box 66,
Al Majma'ah 11952, Saudi Arabia
Mechanical Design Department,
Faculty of Engineering Mataria,
Helwan University,
Cairo 11724, Egypt
e-mail: telbagory@yahoo.com

Tawfeeq A. R. Alkanhal

Vice Dean of Engineering College
Director of the Engineering and Applied Sciences,
Research Center,
Majmaah University,
P.O.Box 66,
Al Majma'ah 11952, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: t.alkanhal@mu.edu.sa

Maher Y. A. Younan

Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies
School of Sciences and Engineering,
The American University in Cairo (AUC),
Cairo 11835, Egypt
e-mail: myounan@aucegypt.edu

Proceedings of the ASME 2014 Pressure Vessels & Piping Division/K-PVP Conference PVP 2014, Anaheim, CA, July 20–24, Paper No. PVP2014-28401.

Pipes & Plastic Products Company (PPP) in the 10th of Ramadan City-Egypt.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received March 28, 2014; final manuscript received January 19, 2015; published online April 16, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Pierre Mertiny.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 137(6), 061202 (Dec 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: PVT-14-1049; doi: 10.1115/1.4029795 History: Received March 28, 2014; Revised January 19, 2015; Online April 16, 2015

The primary objective of the present paper is to depict the mechanical behavior of high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes under different loading conditions with different specimen geometries to provide the designer with reliable design data relevant to practical applications. Therefore, it is necessary to study the effect of strain rate, ring configuration, and grip or fixture type on the mechanical behavior of dumb-bell-shaped (DBS), and ring specimens made from HDPE pipe material. DBS and ring specimens are cut from the pipe in longitudinal and circumferential (transverse) directions, respectively. On the other hand, the ring specimen configuration is classified into two types; full ring (FR), and notched ring (NR) (equal double notch from two sides of NR specimen) specimens according to ASTM D 2290-12 standard. Tensile tests are conducted on specimens cut out from the pipe with thickness of 10 mm at different crosshead speeds (10–1000 mm/min), and ambient temperature, Ta = 20 °C to investigate the mechanical properties of DBS and ring specimens. In the case of test specimens taken from the longitudinal direction from the pipe, a necking phenomenon before failure appears at different locations along the gauge section. On the other hand, the fracture of NR specimens occurs at one notched side. The results demonstrated that the NR specimen has higher yield stress than DBS and FR specimens at all crosshead speeds. The present experimental work reveals that the crosshead speed has a significant effect on the mechanical behavior of both DBS and ring specimens. The fixture type plays an important role in the mechanical behavior for both FR and NR specimens at all crosshead speeds.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic configuration of DBS specimen for thick 10 mm [24,25]

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Fig. 2

Schematic configuration of: (a) FR specimen and (b) NR specimen [26]

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Fig. 3

Schematic illustration of the tensile testing fixture type I [26,29]

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Fig. 4

Configuration of tensile testing fixture type I: (a) before tensile test (clearance is fixed along the half disks) and (b) after tensile test (presence of bending effect)

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Fig. 5

Schematic illustration of split-disk tensile testing fixture type II [26,30]

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Fig. 6

Configuration of tensile testing fixture type II during tensile test for NR specimen; (a) before tensile test (clearance is fixed along the half disks), (b)–(d) during tensile test the distance between half disks remaining constant (no presence of bending effect)

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Fig. 7

Engineering stress–strain diagram for DBS specimen at crosshead speed VC.H = 10–1000 mm/min

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Fig. 8

Engineering stress–strain diagram for FR specimen by fixture type I, at crosshead speed VC.H = 10–1000 mm/min

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Fig. 9

Engineering stress–strain diagram for FR specimen by fixture type II, at crosshead speed VC.H = 10–1000 mm/min

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Fig. 10

Engineering stress–strain diagram for NR specimen by fixture type I, at crosshead speed VC.H = 10–1000 mm/min

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Fig. 11

Engineering stress–strain diagram for NR specimen by fixture type II, at crosshead speed VC.H = 10–1000 mm/min

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Fig. 12

Apparent Young’s modulus as a function of crosshead speed for NR, FR, and DBS specimens with different fixture types

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Fig. 13

Yield strength as a function of crosshead speed for NR, FR, and DBS specimens with different fixture types

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Fig. 14

MT as a function of crosshead speed for NR, FR, and DBS specimens with different fixture types

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Fig. 15

Engineering stress–strain diagram for DBS and FR ring specimens with fixture type I and II at VC.H = 10 mm/min

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Fig. 16

Engineering stress–strain diagram for DBS and FR ring specimens with fixture type I and II at VC.H = 1000 mm/min

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Fig. 17

Engineering stress–strain diagram for DBS, FR, and NR ring specimens with fixture type I at VC.H = 10 mm/min

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Fig. 18

Engineering stress–strain diagram for DBS, FR, and NR ring specimens with fixture type I at VC.H = 1000 mm/min

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