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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Automated Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Analyses Based on Three-Dimensional Finite Elements

[+] Author and Article Information
Hitoshi Nakamura

ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation (CTC),
3-2-5 Kasumigaseki Chiyoda-ku,
Tokyo 100-6080, Japan
e-mail: hitoshin@asme.org

Wenwei Gu

ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation (CTC),
3-2-5 Kasumigaseki Chiyoda-ku,
Tokyo 100-6080, Japan
e-mail: wenwei.gu@ctc-g.co.jp

Seiichi Tajima

ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation (CTC),
3-2-5 Kasumigaseki Chiyoda-ku,
Tokyo 100-6080, Japan
e-mail: seiichi.tajima@ctc-g.co.jp

Osamu Hazama

ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation (CTC),
3-2-5 Kasumigaseki Chiyoda-ku,
Tokyo 100-6080, Japan
e-mail: osamu.hazama@ctc-g.co.jp

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received October 26, 2014; final manuscript received March 15, 2015; published online June 9, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Haofeng Chen.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 137(6), 061406 (Dec 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-14-1170; doi: 10.1115/1.4030085 History: Received October 26, 2014; Revised March 15, 2015; Online June 09, 2015

This paper describes the structure and application of a software system that automates the fatigue initiation and crack propagation analysis based on finite element method (FEM). The system automatically performs necessary procedures to track propagation history of cracks: insertion of a crack and updating of three-dimensional (3D) finite element mesh in accordance with the crack propagation. The system is equipped with a function to automatically perform fatigue analyses using the stress–strain histories at nodes of a 3D FEM model. Some analyses for several examples were carried out for validation. The important example is the surface crack propagation in steel pipes with residual stress.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Description of system and procedure flow of finas/crack

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Fig. 2

Idea of superposition

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Fig. 3

Meshing at the crack front

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Fig. 4

Prediction of crack growth direction

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Fig. 5

Simplified elastic plastic analysis (Neuber [22])

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Fig. 6

Fatigue analysis of notched plate

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Fig. 7

Axial residual stress distribution through the thickness (Nakamura et al. [24])

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Fig. 8

Propagation history (no residual stress, as stress relieved)

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Fig. 9

Load cycles versus crack growth (no residual stress, as stress relieved)

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Fig. 10

Automatic meshing near crack penetration (no residual stress, as stress relieved)

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Fig. 11

Propagation history (tensile residual stress at inner surface, inversed IHSI treated)

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Fig. 12

Load cycles versus crack growth (tensile residual stress at inner surface, inversed IHSI treated)

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Fig. 13

Propagation history (compressive residual stress at inner surface, IHSI treated)

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