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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Flow-Excited Acoustic Resonance of Isolated Cylinders in Cross-Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Nadim Arafa

AeroAcoustics and Noise Control Laboratory,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON L1H7K4, Canada
e-mail: nadim.arafa@uoit.ca

Atef Mohany

AeroAcoustics and Noise Control Laboratory,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON L1H7K4, Canada
e-mail: atef.mohany@uoit.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received December 1, 2014; final manuscript received March 23, 2015; published online August 25, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Jong Chull Jo.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 138(1), 011302 (Aug 25, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-14-1195; doi: 10.1115/1.4030270 History: Received December 01, 2014

The flow-excited acoustic resonance of isolated cylinders in cross-flow is investigated experimentally where the effect of the cylinder(s) proximity to the acoustic particle velocity nodes of the cross-modes is presented in this paper. For the case of a single cylinder, the cylinder's location does not significantly affect the vortex shedding process; however, it affects the excitation level of each acoustic cross-mode. When the cylinder is moved away from the acoustic particle velocity antinode of a specific acoustic cross-mode, a combination of the cross-modes is excited with intensities that seem to be proportional to the ratio of the acoustic particle velocities of these modes at the cylinder's location. For the cases of two and three hydrodynamically uncoupled cylinders positioned simultaneously side-by-side in the duct, it is observed that the first three acoustic cross-modes are excited. When one cylinder is positioned at the acoustic particle velocity antinode of a specific cross-mode and another cylinder is positioned at its acoustic particle velocity node, i.e., a cylinder that should excite the resonance and another one that should not excite it, respectively; the excitation always takes over and the resonance occurs at a further elevated levels. It is also observed that the acoustic pressure levels in the cases of multiple cylinders are not resulting from a linear superposition of the excited level obtained from each individual cylinder which indicates that the removal of cylinders at certain locations may not be a viable technique to eliminate the acoustic resonance in the case of tube bundles.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the experimental setup showing the acoustic particle velocity distribution along the duct height

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Fig. 2

Waterfall plot of the pressure spectra for a single cylinder positioned at Y/H = 0, D = 12.7 mm

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Fig. 3

Aeroacoustic response of a single cylinder in cross-flow positioned at Y/H = 0, D = 12.7 mm

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Fig. 4

Aeroacoustic response of a single cylinder in cross-flow positioned at Y/H = 0.25, D = 12.7 mm

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Fig. 5

Comparison of the aeroacoustic responses of a single cylinder positioned at two vertical locations, D = 12.7 mm

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Fig. 6

Comparison of the normalized acoustic pressure for a single cylinder positioned at various vertical locations, D = 12.7 mm

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Fig. 7

Distribution of the ratio of acoustic particle velocity to the maximum value of acoustic particle velocity for the first cross-mode. The theoretical normalized distribution of the acoustic particle velocity is shown in continuous line.

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Fig. 8

Comparison of the aeroacoustic responses of multiple cylinders, D = 12.7 mm. Cylinders are positioned at the acoustic particle velocity antinodes.

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Fig. 9

Comparison of the aeroacoustic responses of multiple cylinders, D = 12.7 mm. Cylinders are positioned at the acoustic particle velocity nodes.

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Fig. 10

Pressure drop versus the velocity for multiple cylinders, D = 12.7 mm

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Fig. 11

Contour plot of the normalized acoustic pressure distribution in the test section for the second cross-mode in the case of (a) empty duct, (b) single cylinder positioned at Y/H = 0, (c) single cylinder positioned at Y/H = 0.25, and (d) two cylinders positioned at Y/H = 0 and Y/H = 0.25

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Fig. 12

Normalized theoretical acoustic pressure distribution for the second acoustic cross-mode along the top wall of the test section versus the streamwise distance

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