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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

High-Temperature Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of MarBN at 600 °C

[+] Author and Article Information
Richard A. Barrett

Mechanical Engineering,
NUI Galway,
University Road,
Galway H91 HX31, Ireland;
Ryan Institute for Environmental, Marine and
Energy Research,
NUI Galway,
University Road,
Galway H91 HX31, Ireland
e-mail: Richard.barrett@nuigalway.ie

Eimear M. O'Hara

Mechanical Engineering,
NUI Galway,
University Road,
Galway H91 HX31, Ireland;
Ryan Institute for Environmental, Marine and
Energy Research,
NUI Galway,
University Road,
Galway H91 HX31, Ireland
e-mail: e.ohara2@nuigalway.ie

Padraic E. O'Donoghue

Civil Engineering,
NUI Galway,
University Road,
Galway H91 HX31, Ireland;
Ryan Institute for Environmental,
Marine and Energy Research,
NUI Galway,
University Road,
Galway H91 HX31, Ireland
e-mail: Padraic.odonoghue@nuigalway.ie

Sean B. Leen

Mechanical Engineering,
NUI Galway,
University Road,
Galway H91 HX31, Ireland;
Ryan Institute for Environmental,
Marine and Energy Research,
NUI Galway,
University Road,
Galway H91 HX31, Ireland
e-mail: Sean.leen@nuigalway.ie

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 3, 2015; final manuscript received September 26, 2015; published online April 28, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Marina Ruggles-Wrenn.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 138(4), 041401 (Apr 28, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-15-1113; doi: 10.1115/1.4031724 History: Received June 03, 2015; Revised September 26, 2015

This paper presents the high-temperature low-cycle fatigue (HTLCF) behavior of a precipitate strengthened 9Cr martensitic steel, MarBN, designed to provide enhanced creep strength and precipitate stability at high temperature. The strain-controlled test program addresses the cyclic effects of strain-rate and strain-range at 600 °C, as well as tensile stress-relaxation response. A recently developed unified cyclic viscoplastic material model is implemented to characterize the complex cyclic and relaxation plasticity response, including cyclic softening and kinematic hardening effects. The measured response is compared to that of P91 steel, a current power plant material, and shows enhanced cyclic strength relative to P91.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Strain-controlled high-temperature creep-fatigue test rig at NUI Galway

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Fig. 2

Measured cyclic stress–strain response in cast MarBN at 600 °C and a strain-rate of 0.033%/s for (a) the initial cycle and (b) at the half-life

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Fig. 3

Measured tensile stress–strain behavior of cast MarBN steel across various strain-rates at 600 °C

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Fig. 4

Comparison of ES-P91 and cast MarBN stress–strain response for the initial cycle at 600 °C and applied strain-rate of 0.033%/s

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Fig. 5

Comparison of the fatigue life of AR [1012] and ES-P91 to cast MarBN at 600 °C

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Fig. 6

Comparison of (a) the measured cyclic softening behavior and (b) maximum tensile stress in AR [1012], ES-P91, and MarBN at 600 °C

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Fig. 8

Identification of the NLKH material parameters

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Fig. 9

Comparison of the measured stress-relaxation behavior in ES-P91 steel and cast MarBN at a temperature of 600 °C

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Fig. 10

Identification of the cyclic viscoplastic material parameters using the analytical model for stress-relaxation

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Fig. 11

Comparison of the correlation achieved with experimental data under the calibration regime for stress-relaxation and monotonic stress–strain response (inset)

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Fig. 12

Comparison of the measured and predicted stress–strain response of cast MarBN across different strain-ranges for an applied strain-rate of 0.01%/s at 600 °C for (a) the initial cycle and (b) half-life response. The solid lines represent the model and the dots correspond to the experimental values.

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Fig. 13

Measured and predicted stress–strain response at a strain-rate of 0.033%/s and applied strain-range of ±0.5% for the initial and half-life cycles at 600 °C

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Fig. 14

Measured and predicted stress–strain response at a strain-rate of 0.01%/s and applied strain-range of ±0.5% for the initial and half-life cycles at 600 °C

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Fig. 15

Comparison of the maximum stress evolution and plastic strain-range evolution with cycles in cast MarBN at 600 °C, a strain-rate of 0.01%/s, and applied strain-range of ±0.5%

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