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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Flaw Stability Considering Residual Stress for Aging Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Multiple-Purpose Canisters

[+] Author and Article Information
Poh-Sang Lam

Materials Science and Technology,
Savannah River National Laboratory,
Aiken, SC 29808
e-mail: ps.lam@srnl.doe.gov

Robert L. Sindelar

Materials Science and Technology,
Savannah River National Laboratory,
Aiken, SC 29808
e-mail: robert.sindelar@srnl.doe.gov

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 20, 2015; final manuscript received December 4, 2015; published online April 28, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Xian-Kui Zhu.The United States Government retains, and by accepting the article for publication, the publisher acknowledges that the United States Government retains, a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this work, or allow others to do so, for United States government purposes.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 138(4), 041406 (Apr 28, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: PVT-15-1195; doi: 10.1115/1.4032279 History: Received August 20, 2015; Revised December 04, 2015

A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of the MPC, the canister is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in the weld or heat affected zone (HAZ) regions under long-term storage conditions. Logic for flaw acceptance is developed should crack-like flaws be detected by Inservice Inspection. The procedure recommended by API 579-1/ASME FFS-1, Fitness-for-Service, is used to calculate the instability crack length or depth by failure assessment diagram (FAD). It is demonstrated that the welding residual stress (RS) has a strong influence on the results.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Welds on a MPC (reproduced from NUREG-1864 [18], Fig. 16)

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Fig. 2

Case 1: axial crack parallel to an axial weld—RS perpendicular to the axial weld with a double-V notch

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Fig. 3

Case 2: axial crack perpendicular to a circumferential weld—RS parallel to the circumferential weld with a double-V notch

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Fig. 4

Case 3: circumferential crack parallel to a circumferential weld—RS perpendicular to the circumferential weld with a double-V notch

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Fig. 5

Case 4: circumferential crack perpendicular to an axial weld—RS parallel to the axial weld with a double-V notch

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Fig. 6

FAD and crack assessment loci to determine instability crack length for an axial through-wall flaw

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Fig. 7

Flaw acceptance logic proposed for a MPC

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