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Filament Wound Composite Pressure Vessels and Pipes Subject to an Internal Pressure: An Experimental and Material Characterization Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Brian Ellul

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
University of Malta,
Msida MSD 2080, Malta
e-mail: brian.ellul.04@um.edu.mt

Duncan Camilleri

Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
University of Malta,
Msida MSD 2080, Malta
e-mail: duncan.camilleri@um.edu.mt

Jana Grech

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
University of Malta,
Msida MSD 2080, Malta
e-mail: janagrech@gmail.com

Martin Muscat

Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
University of Malta,
Msida MSD 2080, Malta
e-mail: martin.muscat@um.edu.mt

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 22, 2015; final manuscript received December 28, 2015; published online July 18, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Pierre Mertiny.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 138(6), 060907 (Jul 18, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-15-1131; doi: 10.1115/1.4032506 History: Received June 22, 2015; Revised December 28, 2015

This study presents an experimental testing regime conducted on filament wound composite pressure vessels (CPVs) made up of an asymmetric and unbalanced layup (chopped strand mat (CSM)/−82.7 deg/±54.3 deg) and subject to an internal pressure. Polyester reinforced with e-glass CSM and direct roving was used. The mechanical properties of the different lamina used in the test specimens were identified through a series of standardized tests. The evolution of strain and volume changes with respect to the applied pressure loading were recorded. The results also present a characterization of identifiable first-ply failure (FPF) loads based on strain evolution and volume changes, and monitors when ultimate failure occurs.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of helical filament winding and coordinate system

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Fig. 2

Closed-end composite pipe. End section including domes and lap joint (a). Pipe and experimental setup (b).

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Fig. 3

Schematic diagram illustrating the positions of strain gauges. “LP” indicates a linear pattern strain gauge while “R” indicates a strain gauge rosette.

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Fig. 4

Circumcircle subtended by LVDTs

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Fig. 5

Schematic diagram of flat mandrel filament winding machine

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Fig. 6

(Left) Volumetric change (±0.1%) and (right) the variation of the strains (%) of pipe A with respect to the applied pressure (±0.4 bar)

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Fig. 7

(Left) Volumetric change (±0.1%) and (right) the variation of the strains (%) of pipe B with respect to the applied pressure (±0.4 bar)

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Fig. 8

(Left) Volumetric change (±0.1%) and (right) the variation of the strains (%) of pipe C with respect to the applied pressure (±0.4 bar)

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Fig. 9

(Left) Volumetric change (±0.1%) and (right) the variation of the strains (%) of pipe D with respect to the applied pressure (±0.4 bar)

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