0
Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Effect of Pipe Bend Configuration on Guided Waves-Based Defects Detection: An Experimental Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Jing Ni, Pugen Zhang, Yong Li

School of Mechanical and Power Engineering,
East China University of Science
and Technology,
Shanghai 200237, China

Shaoping Zhou

School of Mechanical and Power Engineering,
East China University of Science
and Technology,
Shanghai 200237, China
e-mail: shpzhou@ecust.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received May 29, 2015; final manuscript received September 2, 2015; published online October 6, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Haofeng Chen.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 138(2), 021203 (Oct 06, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: PVT-15-1110; doi: 10.1115/1.4031547 History: Received May 29, 2015; Revised September 02, 2015

Ultrasonic guided waves is one of the most effective nondestructive testing techniques, which has been successfully applied for damage detection and evaluation of piping components. However, research about defects detection for pipelines with multiple bends is still limited. In this paper, effect of pipe bend arrangement on guided waves-based defect detection is investigated by experimental method, in which different configurations including space-Z type, U type, and plane-Z type are considered, respectively. Finite element (FE) simulation is used to explore the propagation behaviors of axisymmetric L (0, 2) mode in different bend configurations. On this basis, the detection sensitivity for different crack locations is experimentally investigated. Simulation and experiment results reveal that feature of guided waves propagation across the first and the second bend is totally different, and the defect detection sensitivity in the second bend is different from that in the first bend.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

The incentive way of guided waves L (0, 2)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

The snapshot of transient stress distribution in the first elbow: (a) space-Z pipe, (b) U pipe, and (c) plane-Z pipe

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

The snapshot of transient stress distribution in the second elbow of space-Z pipe: (a) space-Z pipe, (b) Upipe, and (c) plane-Z pipe

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

The three pipe configurations: (a) plane-U pipe, (b) plane-Z pipe, and (c) space-Z pipe

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Cracks in two different areas of the elbow: (a) the cracks' location in the elbow and (b) crack in intrados (left) and extrados (right)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

The experiment system

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Dispersion curves in the frequency of 0–200 kHz: (a) dispersion curves of phase velocity and (b) dispersion curves of group velocity

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

The amplitude of the end reflected waveform in integrated pipes

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

The received time-domain waveforms (at 115 kHz frequency): (a) for the crack beyond elbows of space-Z pipe, (b) for the crack beyond elbows of plane-Z pipe, and (c) for the crack beyond elbows of U pipe

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

The received time-domain waveform signals at 100 kHz frequency in the first elbow: (a) crack in extrados and (b) crack in intrados

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

The received time-domain waveform signals at 100 kHz frequency in the second elbow: (a) crack in extrados of space-Z pipe, (b) crack in intrados of space-Z pipe, (c) crack in extrados of plane-Z pipe, (d) crack in intrados of plane-Z pipe, (e) crack in extrados of U pipe, and (f) crack in intrados of U pipe

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In