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Research Papers: Seismic Engineering

Comprehensive Seismic Response Analysis for Estimating the Seismic Behavior of Buried Pipelines Enhanced by Three-Dimensional Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Ground Motion and Soil Amplification

[+] Author and Article Information
Tsuyoshi Ichimura

Associate Professor
Earthquake Research Institute,
The University of Tokyo,
1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku,
Tokyo 1130032, Japan
e-mail: ichimura@eri.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Kohei Fujita

Postdoctoral Researcher
RIKEN Advanced Institute for
Computational Science,
7-1-26 Minatojima-minami-machi, Chuo-ku,
Kobe, Hyogo 6500047, Japan
e-mail: kohei.fujita@riken.jp

Pher Errol Quinay

Assistant Professor,
Research Institute for Natural Hazards and Disaster Recovery,
Niigata University,
8050, Ikarashi 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku,
Niigata 9502181, Japan
e-mail: pequinay@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp

Muneo Hori

Professor
Earthquake Research Institute,
The University of Tokyo,
1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku,
Tokyo 1130032, Japan
e-mail: hori@eri.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Takashi Sakanoue

Researcher
Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.,
1-7-7 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku,
Yokohama 2300045, Japan
e-mail: sakanoue@tokyo-gas.co.jp

Ryo Hamanaka

Deputy Manager
Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.,
1-5-20 Kaigan, Minato-ku,
Tokyo 1058527, Japan
e-mail: ryo-hamanaka@tokyo-gas.co.jp

Fumiki Ito

Researcher
Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.,
1-7-7 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku,
Yokohama 2300045, Japan
e-mail: fumiki-ito@tokyo-gas.co.jp

Iwao Suetomi

Group Manager
Eight-Japan Engineering Consultants Inc.,
33-11 Honcho 5-chome, Nakano-ku,
Tokyo 1648601, Japan
e-mail: suetomi-i@ej-hds.co.jp

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 13, 2015; final manuscript received March 25, 2016; published online April 29, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Albert E. Segall.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 138(5), 051801 (Apr 29, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-15-1184; doi: 10.1115/1.4033250 History: Received August 13, 2015; Revised March 25, 2016

We demonstrate a comprehensive earthquake response analysis method for improving the seismic input force estimation of buried pipelines by combining ground motion and soil amplification analyses. Using this method, the seismic input force of an actual pipeline was estimated and its seismic performance was checked for a largest assumed seismic fault scenario. Three-dimensional inhomogeneity of ground and surface topography is known to greatly affect the results of ground motion and soil amplification analyses. To consider these effects, a linear wave propagation analysis using a 10 × 109 degree-of-freedom three-dimensional finite element model was conducted for the ground motion analysis, and a nonlinear wave propagation analysis using an 80 × 106 degree-of-freedom three-dimensional finite element model was conducted for the soil amplification analysis. The application example showed that three-dimensional inhomogeneity of ground and surface topology caused complex seismic input forces to buried pipelines, and demonstrated the effectiveness of the comprehensive seismic analysis method proposed in this study.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic view of comprehensive seismic response analysis

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Fig. 2

(a) The location of the target pipeline, observation points, and assumed fault. The 12 black dots indicate subfaults of the assumed earthquake. The dotted line is the domain of the earthquake ground motion simulation. Pi (i = 1–7) indicate observation points. P4 indicates the target site. (b) Target pipeline with soil structure. The white line indicates the target pipeline, located at P4, and the contour map shows the elevation of the interface between the soft layer and the bedrock (elevation of the ground surface is 72 m).

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Fig. 3

(a) Three-dimensional crust model for computing earthquake ground motion with a fault rupture process and wave propagation. (b) Three-dimensional finite element model of the white rectangular part in (a).

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Fig. 4

Wave profiles and Fourier spectrum in NS directions at each observation point. (a) and (b) Wave profiles, the frequency components of which (i.e., <0.5 and 2.5 Hz) were cut off with a high-cut filter. (c) The Fourier spectrum of the wave profile.

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Fig. 5

Contour map of the elevation of the three-dimensional crust model

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Fig. 6

(a) Three-dimensional soil structure model. The white line indicates the target region and pipeline. A fictitious ground structure is added around the target region to remove reflected waves from the sides. (b) Composition of model. (c) Close-up view of finite element model.

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Fig. 7

Distribution of the time history norm of displacement and its maximum distribution

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Fig. 8

Distribution of the time history maximum principal strain and its maximum distribution

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Fig. 9

Maximum axial tensile strain along the pipeline (color contour) and depth distribution of the interface between the soft layer and the bedrock (black and white contour). These strains were computed from soil amplification analysis using wave profiles observed at P4 and P7.

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