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Review Article

Improvements in Article A-3000 of Appendix A for Calculation of Stress Intensity Factor in Section XI of the 2015 Edition of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code

[+] Author and Article Information
Steven X. Xu

Kinectrics, Inc.,
800 Kipling Avenue,
Toronto, ON M8Z 5G5, Canada
e-mail: steven.xu@kinectrics.com

Russell C. Cipolla

Intertek AIM,
Santa Clara, CA 95054
e-mail: russell.cipolla@intertek.com

Darrell R. Lee

BWX Technologies,
Barberton, OH 44203
e-mail: drlee@bwxt.com

Douglas A. Scarth

Kinectrics, Inc.,
800 Kipling Avenue,
Toronto, ON M8Z 5G5, Canada
e-mail: doug.scarth@kinectrics.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received December 20, 2015; final manuscript received March 24, 2016; published online August 5, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Kunio Hasegawa.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 139(1), 010801 (Aug 05, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: PVT-15-1278; doi: 10.1115/1.4033450 History: Received December 20, 2015; Revised March 24, 2016

Analytical evaluation procedures for determining the acceptability of flaws detected during in-service inspection of nuclear power plant components are provided in Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Linear elastic fracture mechanics based evaluation procedures in ASME Section XI require calculation of the stress intensity factor. Article A-3000 of Appendix A in ASME Section XI prescribes a method to calculate the stress intensity factor for a surface or subsurface flaw by making use of the flaw location stress distribution obtained in the absence of the flaw. The 2015 Edition of ASME Section XI implements a number of significant improvements in Article A-3000. Major improvements include the implementation of an alternate method for calculation of the stress intensity factor for a surface flaw that makes explicit use of the Universal Weight Function Method and does not require a polynomial fit to the actual stress distribution and the inclusion of closed-form equations for stress intensity factor influence coefficients for cylinder geometries. With the inclusion of the explicit weight function approach and the closed-form relations for influence coefficients, the procedures of Appendix A for the calculation of stress intensity factors can be used more efficiently. A review of improvements that have been implemented in Article A-3000 of Appendix A in the 2015 Edition of ASME Section XI is provided in this paper. Example calculations are provided for illustration purpose.

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References

ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, 2013, “ Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components, Section XI, Division 1,” ASME, New York.
ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, 2015, “ Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components, Section XI, Division 1,” ASME, New York.
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Axial inside surface flaw in a cylinder

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Fig. 2

Circumferential inside surface flaw in a cylinder

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Fig. 3

Stress distribution acting over the crack depth

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Fig. 4

Piecewise linear representation of stress over discrete intervals with specified stress data at discrete locations

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Fig. 5

Definition of x distance for the subsurface flaw stress definition: (a) coordinate relative center of subsurface flaw and (b) coordinate relative center of component surface

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Fig. 6

Hoop WRS profiles based on round-robin finite-element analyses

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Fig. 7

Comparison of hoop WRS profile E-ISO with cubic and fourth-order polynomial fit

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Fig. 8

Results of stress intensity factor KI for the deepest point of an axial internal surface crack subjected to WRS E-ISO, using universal weight function method, cubic, and fourth-order polynomial equations to represent stress distribution and finite-element method

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Fig. 9

Ratios of stress intensity factor results using cubic and fourth-order polynomial equations to represent stress distribution and finite-element method to results using universal weight function method, for the deepest point of an axial internal surface crack subjected to WRS profile E-ISO

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Fig. 10

Results of stress intensity factor KI for the surface point of an axial internal surface crack subjected to WRS profile E-ISO, using universal weight function method, cubic, and fourth-order polynomial equations to represent stress distribution

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Fig. 11

Finite-element model for a cylinder with an axial internal surface flaw of semi-elliptical shape with a/t = 0.2, with hoop WRS profile E-ISO applied to crack face

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