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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Residual Stress Distribution in a Dissimilar Weld Joint by Experimental and Simulation Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Wenchun Jiang

State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing,
College of Chemical Engineering,
China University of Petroleum (East China),
Qingdao 266555, China
e-mail: jiangwenchun@126.com

Yun Luo

State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing,
College of Chemical Engineering,
China University of Petroleum (East China),
Qingdao 266555, China

J. H. Li

Department of Nuclear Physics,
China Institute of Atomic Energy,
Beijing 102413, China

Wanchuck Woo

Neutron Science Division,
Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute,
1045 Daedeok-daero,
Yuseong-gu,
Daejeon 305-353, South Korea

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received November 5, 2015; final manuscript received April 26, 2016; published online August 5, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Xian-Kui Zhu.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 139(1), 011402 (Aug 05, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: PVT-15-1248; doi: 10.1115/1.4033532 History: Received November 05, 2015; Revised April 26, 2016

Dissimilar welding between carbon steel and stainless steel is widely used in power plant. A lot of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have occurred in the weld joint, which are affected greatly by residual stresses. This paper presents a study of residual stress in a dissimilar weld between 0Cr18Ni9 steel and 20 low carbon steel with Inconel 182 weld metal, by using neutron diffraction, X-ray diffraction measurement and finite-element method (FEM). The residual stresses show asymmetric distribution due to the dissimilar materials. The maximum longitudinal (1.92ReL304) and transverse stresses (1.07ReL304) are presented in the weld metal and heat effected zone of 20 carbon steel, respectively. Through the thickness of weld metal, the average longitudinal stress is around 370 MPa. The weld root has a stress concentration, and the stresses near the weld root in the 20 steel are larger than those in 0Cr18Ni9 steel, making the weld root become the most risk zone for SCC. With the increase of heat input, the residual stress and plastic deformation around the weld root increase. Hence, low heat input is recommended for the welding between 0Cr18Ni9 steel and 20 carbon steel.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Sketching of the weld sample

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Fig. 2

Macrostructure of dissimilar weld joint

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Fig. 3

Sketch of the measurement of the weld joint by neutron diffraction

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Fig. 4

Sketch of the measurement of the stress-free comb-like sample

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Fig. 5

Finite element meshing of whole model (a) and weld section (b)

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Fig. 6

Thermophysical properties of 0Cr18Ni9 steel (a), 20 carbon steel (b), and Inconel 182 (c)

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Fig. 7

Mechanical properties of 0Cr18Ni9 steel (a), 20 carbon steel (b), and Inconel 182 (c)

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Fig. 8

Microstructures of 0Cr18Ni9 steel (a), 20 carbon steel (b), the first (c), the second (d), the third (e), the fourth weld pass (f), the interface between weld and 0Cr18Ni9 steel (g), and the interface between weld and 20 (h)

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Fig. 9

Residual stress distribution along P1 on the surface

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Fig. 10

Residual stress distribution along P2

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Fig. 11

Distribution of residual stress (a), macro hardness and equivalent plastic strain (b) along P4 in the weld metal

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Fig. 12

Residual stress distribution in the HAZ of 20 carbon steel and 0Cr18Ni9 steel

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Fig. 13

Residual stress distribution along P3 on the bottom surface

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Fig. 14

Effect of heat input on residual stress along the top (a) and bottom surface (b)

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Fig. 15

Effect of heat input on residual stress along the thickness of weld metal

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Fig. 16

Effect of heat input on residual stress in the HAZ at 20 carbon steel side (a) and 0Cr18Ni9 steel side (b)

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Fig. 17

Effect of heat input on equivalent plastic strain along the bottom surface

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