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Technical Brief

Variations in the Postbuckling Behavior of Straight Pipes Due to Steel Grade and Internal Pressure

[+] Author and Article Information
Ngoan T. Do

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
University of Alberta,
Edmonton, AB T6G 2W2, Canada
e-mail: tndo@ualberta.ca

Celal Cakiroglu

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
University of Alberta,
Edmonton, AB T6G 2W2, Canada
e-mail: cakirogl@ualberta.ca

Mustafa Gul

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
University of Alberta,
Edmonton, AB T6G 2W2, Canada
e-mail: mustafa.gul@ualberta.ca

Roger Cheng

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
University of Alberta,
Edmonton, AB T6G 2W2, Canada
e-mail: roger.cheng@ualberta.ca

Millan Sen

Enbridge Pipelines, Inc.,
Edmonton, AB T5J 2J9, Canada
e-mail: Millan.Sen@enbridge.com

Samer Adeeb

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
University of Alberta,
Edmonton, AB T6G 2W2, Canada
e-mail: adeeb@ualberta.ca

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received December 29, 2015; final manuscript received July 11, 2016; published online August 24, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Albert E. Segall.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 139(1), 014501 (Aug 24, 2016) (6 pages) Paper No: PVT-15-1285; doi: 10.1115/1.4034285 History: Received December 29, 2015; Revised July 11, 2016

Pipelines can be subjected to bending loads due to a variety of factors such as seismic activity, slope instability, or discontinuous permafrost. Experimental studies of Sen et al. [1–3] showed that pipelines can fail under bending loads due to pipe body tension side fracture which is a mostly overlooked failure mode in pipelines. Recent numerical studies on the structural behavior of cold bent pipes [4–6] also confirmed the likelihood of the pipe body tension side fracture. Furthermore, it was shown that both the material properties and the level of internal pressure can have a considerable effect on the failure mode of the pipe. In this current work, the parametric studies of internal pressure and material properties are extended to straight pipes using finite-element analysis. The differences in the structural behavior due to using stress–strain curves from test specimens in longitudinal and circumferential direction of the pipe are demonstrated. Using failure criteria based on the equivalent plastic strain, different failure modes corresponding to different levels of internal pressure and yield strength are shown on straight pipes.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Demonstration of the pipe model and assigned coordinate system

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Fig. 2

(a) X80 and (b) X100 material curves used

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Fig. 3

εeqp versus the applied rotation (a) X80-L P = 47% SMYS, (b) X80-L P = 53% SMYS, (c) X80-L P = 60% SMYS

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Fig. 4

εeqp versus the applied rotation (a) X80-C P = 47% SMYS, (b) X100-L P = 53% SMYS, (c) X80-C P = 60% SMYS, (d) X100-L P = 60% SMYS

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Fig. 5

Variation of the end rotation with respect to internal pressure (a) 30% εeqp, (b) 40% εeqp

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