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Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Development of Stress Intensity Factors for Cracks With Large Aspect Ratios in Pipes and Plates

[+] Author and Article Information
Yinsheng Li

Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA),
Shirakata,
Tokai-mura 319-1195, Japan
e-mail: li.yinsheng@jaea.go.jp

Kunio Hasegawa

Center Advanced Innovation Technologies,
VSB-Technical University of Ostrava,
17 listopadu, 15,
Ostrava-Poruba 70800, Czech Republic
e-mail: kunioh@kzh.biglobe.ne.jp

Makoto Udagawa

Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA),
Shirakata,
Tokai-mura 319-1195, Japan
e-mail: udagawa.makoto@jaea.go.jp

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received January 7, 2016; final manuscript received July 4, 2016; published online September 27, 2016. Assoc. Editor: David L. Rudland.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 139(2), 021202 (Sep 27, 2016) (13 pages) Paper No: PVT-16-1004; doi: 10.1115/1.4034286 History: Received January 07, 2016; Revised July 04, 2016

The stress intensity factors (SIFs) for pipes containing semi-elliptical surface cracks with large aspect ratios were calculated by finite-element analysis (FEA). The cracks were circumferential and axial surface cracks inside the pipes. The parameters of the SIFs are crack aspect ratio, crack depth, and the ratio of pipe radius to wall thickness. In comparing SIFs for plates and pipes, it can be clarified that SIFs for both plates and thin pipes with t/Ri ≤ 1/10 are almost the same, and the SIFs for plates can be used as a substitute for pipes with t/Ri ≤ 1/10, where t is the pipe wall thickness, and Ri is the inner radius of the pipe. This means that it is not necessary to provide SIF solutions for pipes with t/Ri ≤ 1/10, and it is suggested that the number of tables for influence coefficient values for pipes can be significantly reduced.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Semi-elliptical surface cracks in plates and pipes: (a) surface crack in plate, (b) circumferential crack in pipe, and (c) axial crack in pipe

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Fig. 2

Geometries of surface semi-elliptical crack: (a) surface semi-elliptical crack with a/λ ≤ 0.5 and (b) surface semi-elliptical crack with a/ > 0.5

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Fig. 3

Stress distribution acting on the crack surface as surface distribution load

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Fig. 4

Singular element used at the crack tip

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Fig. 5

Example mesh near the crack surface for circumferential crack in pipe: (a) a/ℓ = 0.5 and a/t = 0.6 and (b) a/ℓ = 1.0 and a/t = 0.6

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Fig. 6

Relationship between G and the crack front angle for circumferential crack with a/ℓ = 2.0, a/t = 0.8, and t/Ri = 1/10

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Fig. 7

Relationship between G and the crack front angle for axial crack with a/ℓ = 2.0, a/t = 0.8, and t/Ri = 1/10

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Fig. 8

G coefficients at surface points for plate and circumferential cracked pipes (a/ = 1.0 and a/t = 0.4)

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Fig. 9

G coefficients at deepest points for plate and circumferential cracked pipes (a/ = 1.0 and a/t = 0.4)

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Fig. 10

G coefficients at surface points for plate and axial cracked pipes (a/ = 1.0 and a/t = 0.4)

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Fig. 11

G coefficients at deepest points for plate and axial cracked pipes (a/ = 1.0 and a/t = 0.4)

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