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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Transient Simulations of the Fluid–Structure Interaction Response of a Partially Confined Pipe Under Axial Flows in Opposite Directions

[+] Author and Article Information
Konstantinos Kontzialis

Fluid Structure Interaction Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McGill University,
817 Sherbrooke Street West,
Montreal, QC H3A 0C3, Canada
e-mail: konstantinos.kontzialis@mail.mcgill.ca

Kyriakos Moditis

Fluid Structure Interaction Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McGill University,
817 Sherbrooke Street West,
Montreal, QC H3A 0C3, Canada
e-mail: kyriakos.moditis@mail.mcgill.ca

Michael P. Païdoussis

Fellow ASME
Professor
Fluid Structure Interaction Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McGill University,
817 Sherbrooke Street West,
Montreal, QC H3A 0C3, Canada
e-mail: michael.paidoussis@mcgill.ca

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received April 18, 2016; final manuscript received July 25, 2016; published online October 11, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Tomomichi Nakamura.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 139(3), 031303 (Oct 11, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-16-1066; doi: 10.1115/1.4034405 History: Received April 18, 2016; Revised July 25, 2016

This paper presents a numerical study of the dynamic response and stability of a partially confined cantilever pipe under simultaneous internal and external axial flows in opposite directions. The onset of flow-induced vibrations is predicted by the developed numerical model, and moreover, limit-cycle motion occurs as the flow speed becomes larger than a critical value. The numerical results are in good agreement with existing experimental results. The simulation gives control over many physical parameters and provides a better insight into the dynamics of the pipe. A parametric study regarding the stability of the system for varying confinement length is performed. The current results show that there is an increase in the susceptibility of the system to instability as the extent of confinement is increased.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Geometry of the numerical model. The flexible pipe is highlighted in blue color, and the rigid casing and plenum in orange. The black arrow shows the direction of the applied gravitational acceleration.

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Fig. 2

Partially confined pipe discharging fluid

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Fig. 3

Flow equations maximum residual versus number of iterations for transient FSI calculation. Continuity , U-momentum •, V-momentum , and W-momentum .

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Fig. 4

Mesh views: (a) far field mesh view, (b) mesh view in the region of the pipe end, and (c) mesh view in the region of the annulus entrance

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Fig. 6

Time response for the displacement in the x-direction at a point 11 mm above the free pipe end for a flow speed of Ui=5.4

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Fig. 7

Phase diagram of the pipe motion with flow speed of Ui=5.4

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Fig. 8

Trajectory of the monitoring point in the xy-plane for the pipe conveying fluid at flow speed of Ui=5.4

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Fig. 9

rms amplitude versus flow speed. Blue diamonds: experimental results and red asterisks: numerical results.

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Fig. 10

Time response of the pipe with the application of the perturbation force

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Fig. 11

Phase diagram with a perturbation after the development of limit-cycle motion

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Fig. 12

Variation of the rms amplitude relative to the internal flow speed Ui and confinement length La

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Fig. 13

Amplitude of vibration (rms) versus confinement length

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Fig. 14

Approximate critical confinement length versus internal flow speed Ui

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