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Technical Brief

Experimental Study of Channel Driven Cavity Flow for Fluid–Structure Interaction

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. W. Kwon, S. M. Arceneaux

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Naval Postgraduate School,
Monterey, CA 93943

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received July 12, 2016; final manuscript received August 25, 2016; published online October 11, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Jong Chull Jo. This material is declared a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 139(3), 034502 (Oct 11, 2016) (5 pages) Paper No: PVT-16-1113; doi: 10.1115/1.4034674 History: Received July 12, 2016; Revised August 25, 2016

An experimental setup was designed and fabricated for the channel driven cavity flow in order to provide benchmark data for validation of any numerical analysis program for solving fluid–structure interaction (FSI) problems. The channel driven cavity flow is a modification from the lid-driven cavity flow. To provide the fluid–structure interaction, the bottom face of the cavity is a deformable flat plate. All other boundaries are rigid. The fluid motion inside the cavity is driven by the flow through a narrow channel topside of the cavity. To establish suitable boundary conditions for numerical analyses of the experiment, the inlet of the channel has a given fluid velocity, while its outlet has a known pressure. Water is used as the fluid in this study. Multiple strain gages and laser displacement sensors were used to measure dynamic responses of the plate attached at the bottom of the cavity.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Sketch of FSI example problems: (a) channel flow with vertical flexible structure, (b) channel flow with horizontal flexible structure, (c) lid-driven flow in cavity with horizontal flexible structure, and (d) converging–diverging duct with horizontal flexible structure

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Fig. 2

Moving belt over rigid cavity containing fluid

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Fig. 3

Channel driven cavity flow structure

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Fig. 4

Schematic of the overall experimental setup (arrows indicate the flow directions)

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Fig. 5

Actual experimental setup showing channel driven cavity flow structure

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Fig. 6

Deformable plate clamped at the bottom of the cavity box: (a) cavity box flexible plate clamped by two frames and (b) shape and size of each frame used to clamp flexible plate

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Fig. 7

Strain gage locations

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Fig. 8

Time history of strain at the center

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Fig. 9

Plot of mean values of normalized strains as a function of inlet velocity for 1.016 mm thick plate

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Fig. 10

Plot of mean vibrational amplitude of normalized strains as a function of inlet velocity for 1.016 mm thick plate

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Fig. 11

Plot of mean values of normalized deflection as a function of inlet velocity for 1.016 mm thick plate

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Fig. 12

Plot of mean vibrational amplitude of normalized deflection as a function of inlet velocity for 1.016 mm thick plate

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Fig. 13

Plot of mean values of normalized deflection as a function of inlet velocity for 0.508 mm thick plate

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Fig. 14

Plot of mean vibrational amplitude of normalized deflection as a function of inlet velocity for 0.508 mm thick plate

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Fig. 15

Vibrational frequency spectrum of 1.016 mm thick plate

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