0
Research Papers: Design and Analysis

Strain Growth in a Finite-Length Cylindrical Shell Under Internal Pressure Pulse

[+] Author and Article Information
Qi Dong

Institute of Chemical Materials,
China Academy of Engineering Physics,
PO Box 919-319,
Mianyang 621999, China
e-mail: dongqi@caep.cn

Q. M. Li

School of Mechanical,
Aerospace and Civil Engineering,
The University of Manchester,
Pariser Building,
Manchester M13 9PL, UK;
State Key Laboratory of Explosion
Science and Technology,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China
e-mail: qingming.li@manchester.ac.uk

Jinyang Zheng

Institute of Chemical Machinery
and Process Equipment,
Zhejiang University,
Hangzhou 310027, China
e-mail: jyzh@zju.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received February 7, 2016; final manuscript received December 27, 2016; published online February 3, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Albert E. Segall.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 139(2), 021213 (Feb 03, 2017) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-16-1020; doi: 10.1115/1.4035696 History: Received February 07, 2016; Revised December 27, 2016

Strain growth is a phenomenon observed in the elastic response of containment vessels subjected to internal blast loading. The local dynamic response of a containment vessel may become larger in a later stage than its response in the earlier stage. In order to understand the possible mechanisms of the strain growth phenomenon in a cylindrical vessel, dynamic elastic responses of a finite-length cylindrical shell with different boundary conditions subjected to internal pressure pulse are studied by finite-element simulation using LS-DYNA. It is found that the strain growth in a finite-length cylindrical shell with sliding–sliding boundary conditions is caused by nonlinear modal coupling. Strain growth in a finite-length cylindrical shell with free–free or simply supported boundary conditions is primarily caused by the linear modal superposition, possibly enhanced by the nonlinear modal coupling. The understanding of these strain growth mechanisms can guide the design of cylindrical containment vessels.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) Radial displacement-time history of the response at the middle section of the sliding–sliding shell subjected to pressure pulse (first peak strain is 0.001) and (b) The frequency spectrum of the curve in (a)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

The deformed shape of the sliding–sliding shell subjected to pressure pulse (first peak strain is 0.001; the displacement has been multiplied by 10)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

(a) Radial displacement-time history of the response atthe middle section of the sliding–sliding shell subjected toimpulsive loading (first peak strain is 0.006) and (b) The frequency spectrum of the curve in (a)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Circumferential displacement-time history of the response at the middle section of the sliding–sliding shell subjected to impulsive loading (first peak strain is 0.006)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Axial displacement-time history of the response at the middle section of the sliding–sliding shell subjected to impulsive loading (first peak strain is 0.006)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

The deformed shape of the sliding–sliding shell subjected to pressure pulse (first peak strain is 0.006; the displacement has been multiplied by 10)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

(a) Mode shape of the coupled radial-axial modes for n = 3, m = 3, (b) circumferential nodal pattern, and (c) axial nodal pattern

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

(a) Radial displacement-time history of the response of Shell 1 (Sliding-Sliding B.C.) subjected to impulsive loading (first peak strain is 0.01), (b) The frequency spectrum of the curve in (a)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

(a) Radial displacement-time history of the response at the middle section of the free–free shell subjected to impulsive loading (first peak strain is 0.001) and (b) the frequency spectrum of the curve in (a)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

The deformed shape of the free–free shell subjected to pressure pulse (first peak strain is 0.001; The displacement has been multiplied by 10)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Radial displacement-time history of the shell (first peak strain is 0.001) and one third of radial displacement-time history of the shell (first peak strain is 0.003)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

(a) Radial displacement-time history of the response at the middle section of the free–free shell subjected to impulsive loading (first peak strain is 0.006) and (b) the frequency spectrum of the curve in (a)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

The deformed shape of the free–free shell subjected to pressure pulse (first peak strain is 0.006; the displacement has been multiplied by 10)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

(a) Radial displacement-time history of the response at the middle section of the simply supported shell subjected to impulsive loading (first peak strain is 0.006) and (b) the frequency spectrum of the curve in(a)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

(a) A strain-time history of cylindrical explosive Chamber 1 with linear explosive W = 27.3 g RDX and (b) the frequency spectrum [8]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

(a) A strain-time history of a cylindrical containment vessel and (b) the frequency spectrum [20]

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In