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research-article

The Revised Universal Slope Method to Predict the Low-Cycle Fatigue Lives of Elbow and Tee Pipes

[+] Author and Article Information
Hiun Nagamori

Yokohama National University 79-5, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama, 240-8501, Japan
nagamori-hiun-xk@ynu.jp

Koji Takahashi

Yokohama National University 79-5, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama, 240-8501, Japan
takahashi-koji-ph@ynu.ac.jp

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037002 History: Received February 07, 2017; Revised June 03, 2017

Abstract

The stress states of elbow and tee pipes are complex and different from those of straight pipes. The low-cycle fatigue lives of elbows and tees cannot be predicted by Manson’s universal slope method; however, a revised universal method proposed by Takahashi et al. was able to predict with high accuracy the low-cycle fatigue lives of elbows under combined cyclic bending and internal pressure. The objective of this study was to confirm the validity of the revised universal slope method for the prediction of low-cycle fatigue behaviors of elbows and tees of various shapes and dimensions under conditions of in-plane bending and internal pressure. Finite element analysis was carried out to simulate the low-cycle fatigue behaviors observed in previous experimental studies of elbows and tees. The low-cycle fatigue behaviors, such as the area of crack initiation, the direction of crack growth, and the fatigue lives, obtained by the analysis were compared with previously obtained experimental data. Based on this comparison, the revised universal slope method was found to accurately predict the low-cycle fatigue behaviors of elbows and tees under internal pressure conditions regardless of differences in shape and dimensions.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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