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research-article

Electrochemical corrosion finite element analysis and burst pressure prediction of externally corroded underground gas transmission pipelines

[+] Author and Article Information
Ibrahim Gadala

Department of Materials Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 309-6350 Stores Road, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, V6T 1Z4
aboukhaleel@gmail.com

Magd Abdel Wahab

Division of Computational Mechanics, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Faculty of Civil Engineering, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Soete Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Technologiepark Zwijnaarde 903, Zwijnaarde B-9052, Belgium
magd.abdelwahab@tdt.edu.vn; magd.abdelwahab@ugent.be

Akram AlFantazi

Department of Materials Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 309-6350 Stores Road, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, V6T 1Z4Department of Chemical Engineering, The Petroleum Institute, P.O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi, UAE
aalfantazi@pi.ac.ae

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038224 History: Received November 01, 2016; Revised September 18, 2017

Abstract

An integrative numerical simulation approach for pipeline integrity analysis is presented in this work, combining a corrosion model with structural nonlinear stress analysis using the Finite Element Method. Potential distributions in the trapped water existing beneath pipeline coating disbondments are modelled in conjunction with reaction kinetics on the corroding exposed steel surface using a moving boundary mesh. Temperature dependencies (25 & 50 ?C) of reaction kinetics do not greatly affect final corrosion defect geometries after 3-year simulation periods. Conversely, cathodic protection (CP) levels and pH dependencies within the near-neutral pH range (6.7 - 8.5) strongly govern depth profiles caused by corrosion, reaching a maximum of ~3 mm into the pipeline wall. A 0.25 V amplification of CP potential combined with a 0.5 mm widening in disbondment opening size reduces defect penetration by almost 30%. Resulting corrosion defect geometries are used for stress examinations and burst pressure evaluations. Furthermore, nonlinear elastic-plastic stress analysis is carried out using shell elements in order to predict the burst pressure of corroded pipes. Corrosion is modeled by reducing the stiffness of a damaged element that have the dimensions of the defect. The predicted burst pressures are in good agreement with those obtained using experimentally based formula.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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