0
research-article

Fatigue measurement of pipeline steels for the application of transporting gaseous hydrogen

[+] Author and Article Information
Andrew J. Slifka

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, 325 Broadway, m/s 647, Boulder, CO 80305 USA
andrew.slifka@nist.gov

Elizabeth S Drexler

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, 325 Broadway, m/s 647, Boulder, CO 80305 USA
elizabeth.drexler@nist.gov

Robert Amaro

University of Alabama, 401 7th Ave., Tuscaloosa, AL 35487
robert.amaro67@gmail.com

Louis E Hayden

Louis Hayden Associates, 1301 Bonnie Ave., Bethlehem, PA 18017 USA
911guy@gmail.com

Douglas G Stalheim

DGS Metallurgical Solutions, 15003 NE 10th St., Vancouver, WA 98684 USA
dgstalheim@dgsmet.com

Damian S Lauria

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Office of Information Systems Management, 325 Broadway, m/s 187, Boulder, CO 80305 USA
damian.lauria@nist.gov

Nik W Hrabe

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, 325 Broadway, m/s 647, Boulder, CO 80305 USA
nik.hrabe@nist.gov

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038594 History: Received March 31, 2017; Revised November 13, 2017

Abstract

A comprehensive testing program to determine the fatigue crack growth rate of pipeline steels in pressurized hydrogen gas was completed. Four steels were selected, two X52 and two X70 alloys. Other variables included hydrogen gas pressures of 5.5 MPa and 34 MPa, a load ratio, R, of 0.5, and cyclic loading frequencies of 1 Hz, 0.1 Hz, and 0.01 Hz. Of particular interest was whether the X70 materials would exhibit higher fatigue crack growth rates than the X52 materials. The American Petroleum Institute (API) steel designations are based on specified minimum yield strength, and monotonic tensile tests have historically shown that loss of ductility correlates with an increase in yield strength when tested in a hydrogen environment. The X70 materials performed within the experimental spread of the X52 materials in fatigue crack growth rate, except for the vintage X52 material at low (5.5 MPA) pressure in hydrogen gas. This program was developed in order to provide a modification to the ASME B31.12 code that is based upon fatigue, the primary failure mechanism in pipelines. The code modification is a three-part Paris law fit of the upper bound of measurements of fatigue crack growth rate of pipeline steels in pressurized hydrogen gas. Fatigue crack growth data up to 21 MPa (3000 psi) are used for the upper bound. This paper describes, in detail, the testing that formed the basis for the code modification.

Section 4: U.S. Gov Employees + Reg Authors
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In