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Research Papers: Operations, Applications and Components

Evaluation of Magnetostrictive Transducers for Guided Wave Monitoring of Pressurized Pipe at 200 °C

[+] Author and Article Information
Sergey Vinogradov

Southwest Research Institute,
6220 Culebra Road,
San Antonio, TX 78238
e-mail: svinogradov@swri.org

Thomas Eason

BP Products North America,
150 W. Warrenville Road,
Naperville, IL 60563
e-mail: tom.eason@bp.com

Mark Lozev

BP Products North America,
150 W. Warrenville Road,
Naperville, IL 60563

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 14, 2017; final manuscript received December 6, 2017; published online February 20, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Steve J. Hensel.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 140(2), 021603 (Feb 20, 2018) (7 pages) Paper No: PVT-17-1153; doi: 10.1115/1.4038726 History: Received August 14, 2017; Revised December 06, 2017

Many piping networks in processing plants, such as refineries, chemical plants, and electric power generation plants, are operated at elevated temperatures (≥250 °F or 121 °C). Failure of these insulated high temperature pipes can cause a major disruption of plant operation. In addition to inspection during the regular plant shutdowns, processing industries are looking for ways to inspect and monitor these pipelines on-line to ensure safe operation of the plants. Permanent monitoring of high temperature structures would require addressing the following technical problems: supporting the sensor functionality at high temperatures, ensuring the probe durability, and maintaining good coupling of the probe to the structure. In this work, a probe utilizing magnetostrictive transduction was tested on a mockup at 200 °C and produced a steady high amplitude signal over a period of 270 days. Probe performance parameters such as signal to noise ratio, data reproducibility, and sensitivity to anomalies are discussed.

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References

Cawley, P. , Cegla, F. , and Galvagni, A. , 2012, “ Guided Waves for NDT and Permanently-Installed Monitoring,” Insight, 54(11), pp. 594–601. [CrossRef]
Rose, J. L. , 2002, “ A Baseline and Vision of Ultrasonic Guided Wave Inspection Potential,” ASME J. Pressure Vessel Technol., 124(3), pp. 273–282. [CrossRef]
Mudge, P. J. , 2001, “ Field Application of the Teletest Long-Range Ultrasonic Testing Technique,” Insight, 43(2), pp. 74–77.
Kwun, H. , Kim, S. Y. , and Light, G. M. , 2003, “ The Magnetostrictive Sensor Technology for Long Range Guided Wave Testing and Monitoring of Structures,” Mater. Eval., 61(1), pp. 80–84.
Vinogradov, S. , Duffer, C. , and Light, G. , 2014, “ Magnetostrictive Sensing Probes for Guided Wave Testing of High Temperature Pipes,” Mater. Eval., 72(6), pp. 803–811.
Vinogradov, S. , Light, G. , Eason, T. , and Lozev, M. , 2017, “ Mockup Evaluation of Magnetostrictive Transducers for Guided Wave Monitoring of Pipe at 200 °C,” 26th ASNT Research Symposium, Jacksonville, FL, Mar. 13–16, pp. 259–266.
Vinogradov, S. , 2010, “ Method and System for Generating and Receiving Torsional Guided Waves in a Structure,” Ihi Southwest Technologies, Inc., San Antonio, TX, U.S. Patent No. 7,821,258, B2.
Vinogradov, S. , Cobb, A. , and Light, G. , 2017, “ Review of Magnetostrictive Transducers (MsT) Utilizing Reversed Wiedemann Effect,” AIP Conf. Proc., 1806(1), p. 020008.
Vinogradov, S. , and Leonard, J. , 2010, “ Development of Magnetostrictive Sensor Technology for Guided Wave Examinations of Piping and Tubing,” Tenth European Conference on NDT, Moscow, Russia, June 7–11.
Croxford, A. J. , Wilcox, P. D. , Drinkwater, B. , and Konstantinidis, G. , 2007, “ Strategies for Guided-Wave Structural Health Monitoring,” Proc. R. Soc., 463(2087), pp. 2961–2981. [CrossRef]

Figures

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Fig. 5

Temperature effect on reading: (a) overlapped raw data acquired at day 213 at 69 °F and day 54 at 396 °F and (b) the same two data sets overlapped after applying a compensation for velocity change (Figure reproduced with permission from Vinogradov et al. [6]. Copyright © 2017, American Society for Nondestructive Testing.)

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Fig. 2

(a) Magnetostrictive transducer coupling using acoustic membrane and (b) MsT with clamping ring installed on the mockup pipe (Figure reproduced with permission from Vinogradov et al. [6]. Copyright © 2017, American Society for Nondestructive Testing.)

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Fig. 1

(a) Magnetostrictive transducer design and (b) a drawing of segmented version of MsT used in this project (Figure reproduced with permission from Vinogradov et al. [6]. Copyright © 2017, American Society for Nondestructive Testing.)

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Fig. 4

Temperature records between day 1 (the day of sensor installation) and a day 217 (Figure reproduced with permission from Vinogradov et al. [6]. Copyright © 2017, American Society for Nondestructive Testing.)

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Fig. 3

Mockup used for the test and locations of two MsT transducers (Figure reproduced with permission from Vinogradov et al. [6]. Copyright © 2017, American Society for Nondestructive Testing.)

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Fig. 6

Effect of thermal cycling on transducer performance: (a) overlapped raw data acquired at day 217 at 202 °C (396 °F) and day 54 at 202 °C (396 °F) and (b) same data at a smaller amplitude scale (Figure reproduced with permission from Vinogradov et al. [6]. Copyright © 2017, American Society for Nondestructive Testing.)

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Fig. 9

A-scan trace acquired from MsT1 (rectified positive) overlapped with A-scan trace acquired from MsT2 (rectified negative)

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Fig. 7

Results of applying BSA to data acquired at day 50 at 190.5 °C (375 °F) (no defects) and at day 217 at 202 °C (396 °F) (after 1.5% and 2.5% defects were introduced): (a) data acquired at both days (green and red traces) and results of BSA (black trace) using full vertical scale and (b) BSA trace shown between 3.6 and 8.5 m (12 and 28 feet) (Figure reproduced with permission from Vinogradov et al. [6]. Copyright © 2017, American Society for Nondestructive Testing.)

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Fig. 8

Utilizing a pool of baseline traces for tracking relevant indications: (a) overlapped baseline traces acquired by subtracting days 54–50, days 61–50, and days 217–50 and (b) index “A” trace giving higher amplitudes to steady indications

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