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research-article

Development of a Model for Hydrogen-Assisted Fatigue Crack Growth in API Pipeline Steel

[+] Author and Article Information
Robert Amaro

University of Alabama, 401 7th Ave., Tuscaloosa, AL
robert.amaro67@gmail.com

Ryan M White

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, 325 Broadway, m/s 647, Boulder, CO 80305 USA
ryan.white@nist.gov

Chris P Looney

Colorado School of Mines, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 1812 Illinois St, Golden, CO 80401 USA
clooney@mymail.mines.edu

Elizabeth S Drexler

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, 325 Broadway, m/s 647, Boulder, CO 80305 USA
elizabeth.drexler@nist.gov

Andrew J. Slifka

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, 325 Broadway, m/s 647, Boulder, CO 80305 USA
andrew.slifka@nist.gov

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038824 History: Received March 31, 2017; Revised November 14, 2017

Abstract

Hydrogen has been proposed as a potential partial solution to the need for a clean-energy economy. In order to make this a reality, large-scale hydrogen transportation networks need to be engineered and installed. Steel pipelines are the most likely candidate for the required hydrogen transportation network. One historical barrier to the use of steel pipelines to transport hydrogen was a lack of experimental data and models pertaining to the fatigue response of steels in gaseous hydrogen. Extensive research at NIST has been performed in conjunction with the ASME B31.12 Hydrogen Piping and Pipeline committee to fill this need. After a large number of fatigue crack growth tests were performed in gaseous hydrogen, a phenomenological model was created to correlate the applied loading conditions, geometry, and hydrogen pressure to the resultant hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth response of the steels. As a result of this extensive data set, and a simplification of the above-mentioned phenomenological model, the ASME B31.12 code was modified to enable the use of higher-strength steels without penalty, thereby resulting in the potential for considerable installation cost savings. This paper details the modelling effort that led to the code change.

Section 3: U.S. Gov Contractors
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