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research-article

The repaired weld residual stress in tube to tube-sheet joint by neutron diffraction measurement and finite element method

[+] Author and Article Information
Yun Luo

State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, College of Chemical Engineering, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao, 266580, PR China
luoyun1003@163.com

Wenchun Jiang

State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, College of Chemical Engineering, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao, 266580, PR China
jiangwenchun@126.com

Dongfeng Chen

Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, 102413, China
dfchenciae@126.com

Robert C. Wimpory

Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin, Germany
robert.wimpory@helmholtz-berlin.de

Meijuan Li

Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, 102413, China
mjlimjli@hotmail.com

Xiaolong Liu

Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, 102413, China
liuxiaolong@ciae.ac.cn

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039069 History: Received August 14, 2017; Revised December 28, 2017

Abstract

Repair welding is a popular method to repair the leakage zone in tube-to-tubesheet joint of shell-tube heat exchangers. But the repaired residual stresses are generated inevitably and have a great effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In this paper, the effects of repair welding on residual stress were studied by finite element method (FEM) and neutron diffraction measurement. The original weld residual stresses by FEM have a good agreement with neutron diffraction measurement results. After repair welding, the transverse residual stresses merely have on changes while the longitudinal residual stresses are increased in the repair zone. In non-repair zone, both the transverse and longitudinal stress are decreased. The repair welding times have little effect on residual stress distribution. With the increase of welding length and heat input, the residual stresses increase. Repair opposite to the original welding direction is recommended because it reduce the residual stress to the minimum.

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