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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Prediction of Pressure Variation at an Elbow Subsequent to a Liquid Slug Impact by Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

[+] Author and Article Information
Ali Ersin Dinçer

Hydromechanics Laboratory K3-109,
Department of Civil Engineering,
Middle East Technical University,
Çankaya/Ankara 06800, Turkey
e-mail: aliersin@metu.edu.tr

Zafer Bozkuş

Hydromechanics Laboratory K3-210,
Department of Civil Engineering,
Middle East Technical University,
Çankaya/Ankara 06800, Turkey
e-mail: bozkus@metu.edu.tr

A. S. Tijsseling

Department of Mathematics and
Computer Science,
Eindhoven University of Technology,
P.O. Box 513,
Eindhoven 5600 MB, The Netherlands
e-mail: a.s.tijsseling@tue.nl

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received March 10, 2017; final manuscript received March 14, 2018; published online April 20, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Tomomichi Nakamura.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 140(3), 031303 (Apr 20, 2018) (7 pages) Paper No: PVT-17-1046; doi: 10.1115/1.4039696 History: Received March 10, 2017; Revised March 14, 2018

Liquid slug flow driven by pressurized air in an inclined pipe with a downstream elbow is investigated numerically. As the liquid slug hits the elbow, the impact pressure and the associated force generated at the elbow may damage pipe supports as well as the pipe itself. It is essential for the design engineers of pipeline systems to accurately predict the pressure trace during the impact for safe operation. The slug arrival velocity and slug length (i.e., mass) at the elbow directly affect that pressure. In order to calculate these slug parameters just before the impact, an improved one-dimensional (1D) model proposed in the literature is used. At the elbow, pressure variation with respect to time is calculated by a recently developed computer code which uses a two-dimensional (2D) smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. In the numerical setup, two representative initial slug lengths, one for short slugs and one for long slugs, and three different initial air tank pressures are used. The obtained numerical data are validated with available experimental results. For both short and long slugs, calculated peak pressures show great agreement with measured peak pressures.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Slug motion with holdup taken from Ref. [18] (Permission to reprint from ASME, copyright 2016)

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Fig. 2

Experimental setup used in Ref. [15] (Permission to reprint from ASME, copyright 2004)

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Fig. 3

Initial liquid slug in an inclined pipe from Ref. [15] (Permission to reprint from ASME, copyright 2004)

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Fig. 4

Boundary and initial (t = 0) conditions used in SPH setup (not to scale)

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Fig. 5

Pressure history at the elbow for a 24 kg slug and driving pressures of (a) 3 bar, (b) 4 bar, and (c) 5 bar

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Fig. 6

Pressure history at the elbow for a 40 kg slug and driving pressures of (a) 3 bar, (b) 4 bar, and (c) 5 bar

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Fig. 7

Particle distribution and flow separation at the elbow (at t = 0.015 s)

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