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Research Papers: Fluid-Structure Interaction

Large Eddy Simulation of Fluid-Elastic Instability in Square Normal Cylinder Array

[+] Author and Article Information
Vilas Shinde, Franck Baj

IMSIA,
Boulevard Gaspard Monge,
Paris Saclay University,
Palaiseau 91120, France

Elisabeth Longatte

IMSIA,
Boulevard Gaspard Monge,
Paris Saclay University,
Palaiseau 91120, France
e-mail: elongatte@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received May 22, 2017; final manuscript received May 21, 2018; published online June 18, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Tomomichi Nakamura.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 140(4), 041301 (Jun 18, 2018) (9 pages) Paper No: PVT-17-1094; doi: 10.1115/1.4040417 History: Received May 22, 2017; Revised May 21, 2018

Large eddy simulations (LES) are performed at low Reynolds number (2000–6000) to investigate the dynamic fluid-elastic instability in square normal cylinder array for a single-phase fluid cross flow. The fluid-elastic instability is dominant in the flow normal direction, at least for all water-flow experiments (Price, S., and Paidoussis, M., 1989, “The Flow-Induced Response of a Single Flexible Cylinder in an in-Line Array of Rigid Cylinders,” J. Fluids Struct., 3(1), pp. 61–82). The instability appears even in the case of single moving cylinder in an otherwise fixed-cylinder arrangement resulting in the same critical velocity (Khalifa, A., Weaver, D., and Ziada, S., 2012, “A Single Flexible Tube in a Rigid Array as a Model for Fluidelastic Instability in Tube Bundles,” J. Fluids Struct., 34, pp. 14–32); Khalifa et al. (2013, “Modeling of the Phase Lag Causing Fluidelastic Instability in a Parallel Triangular Tube Array,” J. Fluids Struct., 43, pp. 371–384). Therefore, in the present work, only a central cylinder out of 20 cylinders is allowed to vibrate in the flow normal direction. The square normal (90 deg) array has 5 rows and 3 columns of cylinders with 2 additional side columns of half wall-mounted cylinders. The numerical configuration is a replica of an experimental setup except for the length of cylinders, which is of 4 diameters in numerical setup against about 8 diameters in the experiment facility. The single-phase fluid is water. The standard Smagorinsky turbulence model is used for the subgrid scale eddy viscosity modeling. The numerical results are analyzed and compared to the experimental results for a range of flow velocities in the vicinity of the instability. Moreover, instantaneous pressure and fluid-force profiles on the cylinder surface are extracted from the LES calculations in order to better understand the dynamic fluid-elastic instability.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Experimental device featuring 15 cylinders distributed in 5 rows and 3 columns with 2 additional side columns of half wall-mounted cylinders as described in Ref. [19]

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Fig. 2

Geometry of the computational domain with the inflow direction Ox, the cross flow direction Oy, and the length direction Oz

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Fig. 3

Near-wall mesh inside the tube array (left). Mesh details close to near-wall region inside the tube array (right).

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Fig. 4

Schematic of the fluid-structure coupling for the central moving cylinder

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Fig. 5

Comparison of the modal frequency of cylinder response: LES versus experiment

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Fig. 6

Response of the central cylinder at u*=2.00: numerical (left) versus experimental (right) signals

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Fig. 7

Power spectral density of the cylinder response at reduced velocity u*=2.00: numerical (0.1≤ fn (0.1≤ 2000) versus experimental (0.1 ≤ fn ≤ 20) spectra

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Fig. 8

An instantaneous vorticity (absolute) plot at reduced velocity u*=2.00

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Fig. 9

Iso-surfaces of the instantaneous velocity (magnitude, m/s) at 0.2 (large spread region), 0.3 (interstitial regions), and 0.4 (localised interstitial regions)

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Fig. 10

The time-averaged pressure (Pa) profile on the cylinder surface at u*=2.00

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Fig. 11

The azimuthal pressure and total force (in the Y direction) profiles (time-length averaged)

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Fig. 12

The instantaneous pressure (Pa) profiles on the cylinder surface, evolving with time for approximately one period of its frequency at various reduced velocities (u*): u*=1.00, u*=1.25, u*=1.50, u*=1.75, u*=2.00, u*=2.25, u*=2.50

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Fig. 13

The instantaneous velocity fields at u*=2.00 and u*=2.25, depicting the correspondence with the time evolution of pressure profiles in Fig. 12

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Fig. 14

Power spectral densities of Y velocity in static and dynamic cases at an upstream (P1) and a downstream (P3) location, respectively, upstream and downstream the moving cylinder, in comparison with the cylinder response spectrum for increasing reduced velocity: (a) location P1, u∗=1; (b) location P3, u∗=1; (c) location P1, u∗=1.50; (d) location P3, u∗=1.50; (e) location P1, u∗=2.00; and (f) location P3, u∗=2.00

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