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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Modeling Creep Deformation and Damage Behavior of Tempered Martensitic Steel in the Framework of Additive Creep Rate Formulation

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Christopher

Materials Development and Technology Division,
Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, HBNI,
Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu, India
e-mail: jchris@igcar.gov.in

B. K. Choudhary

Materials Development and Technology Division,
Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, HBNI,
Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu, India
e-mail: bkc.igcar@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received July 25, 2017; final manuscript received June 28, 2018; published online August 2, 2018. Assoc. Editor: San Iyer. This work was prepared while under employment by the Government of India as part of the official duties of the author(s) indicated above, as such copyright is owned by that Government, which reserves its own copyright under national law.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 140(5), 051401 (Aug 02, 2018) (8 pages) Paper No: PVT-17-1133; doi: 10.1115/1.4040789 History: Received July 25, 2017; Revised June 28, 2018

Additive creep rate model has been developed to predict creep strain-time behavior of materials important to engineering creep design of components for high temperature applications. The model has two additive formulations: the first one is related to sine hyperbolic rate equation describing primary and secondary creep deformation based on the evolution of internal stress with strain/time, and the second defines the tertiary creep rate as a function of tertiary creep strain. In order to describe creep data accurately, tertiary creep rate relation based on MPC-Omega methodology has been appropriately modified. The applicability of the model has been demonstrated for tempered martensitic plain 9Cr-1Mo steel for different applied stresses at 873 K. Based on the observations, a power law relationship between internal stress and applied stress has been established for the steel. Further, a higher creep damage accumulation with increasing life fraction has been observed at low stresses than those obtained at high stresses.

Copyright © 2018 by ASME
Topics: Creep , Steel , Stress , Damage , Modeling
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Figures

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Fig. 8

Experimental creep rate (ε˙) versus creep strain (ε) for 9Cr-1Mo steel tubeplate forging at 873 K for different stresses. The best-fit creep data predicted using model-B are superimposed as full lines.

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Fig. 7

Experimental creep strain (ε) versus time (t) for 9Cr-1Mo steel tubeplate forging at 873 K for different stresses. The best-fit creep data predicted using model-B are superimposed as full lines.

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Fig. 6

Variations of primary plus secondary and tertiary creep strain contributions with time predicted using model-A and model-B at 873 K for 60 MPa

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Fig. 5

Experimental creep rate (ε˙) versus creep strain (ε) for 9Cr-1Mo steel tubeplate forging at 873 K for 60 MPa. The respective best-fit creep data obtained for model-A and model-B are superimposed as full and broken lines, respectively.

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Fig. 4

Experimental creep strain (ε) versus time (t) for 9Cr-1Mo steel tubeplate forging at 873 K for 60 MPa. The respective best-fit creep data obtained for model-A and model-B are superimposed as full and broken lines, respectively.

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Fig. 3

Microstructures of 9Cr-1Mo steel for (a) tubeplate forging in quenched and tempered (Q + T), (b) tubeplate forging in SPWHT, and (c) plate material in normalized and tempered (N + T) conditions

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Fig. 2

Theoretical plots depicting the influence of tertiary creep constants (a) β with η = 0.5 and (b) η with β = 25 on the ratio of tertiary creep rate and secondary creep rate

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Fig. 1

Typical creep rate (ε˙)-creep strain (ε) data for 9% chromium containing steels at high temperatures

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Fig. 9

Variations in the ratio of internal stress and applied stress (σa), i.e., initial internal stress (σi0/σa) and internal stress at saturation (σis/σa) with applied stress. Inter-relationships between internal stress and applied stress obeying power law are depicted by full lines.

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Fig. 10

Variations in tertiary creep constants β and η with applied stress (σa) for 9Cr-1Mo steel tubeplate forging at 873 K

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Fig. 11

Variations in βεtrη with life fraction (t/tr) for 9Cr-1Mo steel tubeplate forging at 873 K for different stresses

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Fig. 12

Experimental creep stain (ε) versus time (t) for 9Cr-1Mo steel with different conditions of tubeplate forging in quenched and tempered (Q + T), tubeplate forging in SPWHT and plate material in normalized and tempered (N + T) at 873 K for 60 MPa. The best-fit creep data predicted using model-B are superimposed as full lines.

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Fig. 13

Experimental creep rate (ε˙) versus creep strain (ε) for 9Cr-1Mo steel with different conditions of tubeplate forging in quenched and tempered (Q + T), tubeplate forging in SPWHT and plate material in normalized and tempered (N + T) at 873 K for 60 MPa. The best-fit creep data predicted using model-B are superimposed as full lines.

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Fig. 14

Variations in βεtrη with life fraction (t/tr) for 9Cr-1Mo steel with different conditions of tubeplate forging in quenched and tempered (Q + T), tubeplate forging in SPWHT and plate material in normalized and tempered (N + T) at 873 K for 60 MPa

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Fig. 15

Comparison between experimental (tr,exp) and predicted (tr,pre) rupture lives for 9Cr-1Mo steel in different conditions. tr,exp = tr,pre relation is shown by full line.

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