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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Theoretical and Finite Element Analysis of Residual Stress Field for Different Geometrical Features After Abrasive Waterjet Peening

[+] Author and Article Information
Meng Zhang, Yuanxi Zhang, Shusen Zhao, Lei Chen

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Zhengzhou University,
Zhengzhou 450001, China

Zhanshu He

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Zhengzhou University,
Zhengzhou 450001, China
e-mail: hezhanshu@qq.com

Xingdong Wang, Ting Fu

Ministry of Education and Hubei Key
Laboratory of Mechanical Transmission
and Manufacturing Engineering,
Wuhan University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan 430080, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received March 27, 2018; final manuscript received November 6, 2018; published online December 7, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Oreste S. Bursi.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 141(1), 011401 (Dec 07, 2018) (12 pages) Paper No: PVT-18-1066; doi: 10.1115/1.4041940 History: Received March 27, 2018; Revised November 06, 2018

Abrasive waterjet (AWJ) peening can be used for metal surface strengthening by introducing near-surface plastic strain and compressive residual stress. The present studies seldom focus on residual stress by AWJ peening of targets with different geometrical features. In fact, those targets usually exist on some machine parts including gear roots, shaft shoulders, and stress concentration areas. According to Hertz theory of contact and Miao's theoretical model for predicting residual stress of flat surface, this paper developed a theoretical model for investigating residual stress of targets with different geometrical features including concave arc surface, concave sphere surface, convex arc surface, and sphere surface. AWJ peening of targets with different geometrical features and different radii of Gaussian curved surface was simulated by abaqus. Theoretical results were consistent with numerical simulation results and published experimental results (H. Y. Miao, S. Larose, et al., 2010, “An analytical approach to relate shot peening parameters to Almen intensity,” Surf. Coat. Technol., 205, pp. 2055–2066; Cao et al., 1995, “Correlation of Almen arc height with residual stresses in shot peening process”, Mater. Sci. Technol. 11, pp. 967–973.), which will be helpful for predicting residual stress of gear roots, shaft shoulders, and stress concentration areas after AWJ peening. The research results showed that under the same peening parameters, σmax, σtop, dmax, and dbottom in concave surface (including concave arc surface and concave sphere surface) were the maximum; σmax, σtop, dmax, and dbottom in convex surface (including convex arc surface and sphere surface) were the minimum; for concave surface, σtop, σmax, dbottom, and dmax decreased, respectively, with target radius; for convex surface, σtop, σmax, dbottom, and dmax increased, respectively, with target radius.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of AWJ peening and the process parameters and the new pattern of AWJ nozzle for orderly shots on surfaces with different geometrical features

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Fig. 2

Impact of an elastic sphere shot on targets with different geometrical features: (a) concave arc surface, (b) concave sphere surface, (c) convex arc surface, and (d) sphere surface

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Fig. 3

Geometry of contacting surfaces in the x-direction between the elastic sphere and elastic target component with concave arc surface (R1 and R2 is the initial radii of the sphere and the target, respectively. u¯z1(r)andu¯z2(r)are the normal displacement fields on the surface of the sphere and the target, respectively. δ1 and δ2 are the displacements of the centers of the sphere and the target, respectively. ae is the radius of the contact surface).

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Fig. 4

Geometry of contacting surfaces in the y-direction between the elastic sphere and elastic target component with concave arc surface

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Fig. 5

Geometry of contacting surfaces between the elastic sphere and elastic target component with concave sphere surface

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Fig. 6

Geometry of contacting surfaces in the x-direction between the elastic sphere and elastic target component with convex arc surface

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Fig. 7

Geometry of contacting surfaces in the y-direction between the elastic sphere and elastic target component with convex arc surface

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Fig. 8

Geometry of contacting surfaces between the two elastic spheres

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Fig. 9

The diagram of four physics parameters identifying different residual stresses and their depths

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Fig. 10

Schematic diagram of elastic–plastic model of Al6061-T6 with isotropic hardening

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Fig. 11

Finite element model for orderly shots on flat surface

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Fig. 12

Symmetric finite element model of orderly shots on targets with different geometrical features: (a) concave arc surface, (b) concave sphere surface, (c) convex arc surface, and (d) sphere surface

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Fig. 13

Comparison of theoretical induced residual stress, numerical simulated induced residual stress, and published experimental residual stress from Miao et al. and Cao et al. for flat surface

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Fig. 14

Cloud charts of induced residual stresses for different geometrical features (R=1mm) after full peening coverage: (a) concave arc surface, (b) concave sphere surface, (c) convex arc surface, (d) sphere surface, and (e) flat surface

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Fig. 15

Influence of different geometrical features (R=1mm) on distribution of induced residual stress field

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Fig. 16

Influence of different Gaussian curved radii on distribution of induced residual stress and comparison of theoretical model and FE model: (a) concave arc surface, (b) concave sphere surface, (c) convex arc surface, and (d) sphere surface

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