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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Development of a Thermal Autofrettage Setup to Generate Compressive Residual Stresses on the Surfaces of a Cylinder

[+] Author and Article Information
Rajkumar Shufen, Nilkamal Mahanta

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati,
Guwahati, Assam 781 039, India

Uday S. Dixit

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati,
Guwahati, Assam 781 039, India
e-mails: uday@iitg.ac.in;
usd1008@yahoo.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received March 23, 2019; final manuscript received June 11, 2019; published online July 17, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Reza Adibi-Asl.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 141(5), 051403 (Jul 17, 2019) (12 pages) Paper No: PVT-19-1052; doi: 10.1115/1.4044119 History: Received March 23, 2019; Revised June 11, 2019

Recently, a heat treatment technique has been proposed to induce compressive residual stresses at the vicinity of the outer wall of a thermally autofrettaged cylinder. In the proposed technique, the outer wall of a thermally autofrettaged vessel is heated above the lower critical temperature while temperature of the inner wall is kept below it. The cylinder is then quenched, which induces compressive residual stresses both at the inner and outer walls. This article presents the construction and working of an experimental setup to carry out the proposed heat treatment coupled thermal autofrettage process. Experiments are carried out on AH36 mild steel cylinders to assess the presence of the compressive residual stresses. Measurement of microhardness and opening angle of cut in a thermally autofrettaged AH36 steel cylinder provided the evidence for compressive residual stresses at the outer wall of the cylinder. A finite element method (FEM) technique was used to predict the opening angle of cut. Predicted opening angle was fairly close to experimental observation.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

A typical heat treatment coupled thermal autofrettage process

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Fig. 2

The meshed axisymmetric model with the boundary conditions

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Fig. 3

Distribution of (a) stresses after the loading step (Ta = 20 °C and Tb = 200 °C) and (b) residual stresses after the unloading step in AH36 steel cylinder with (Ta = Tb = 20 °C)

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Fig. 4

Distribution of (a) stresses after reloading step with Ta = 635 °C and Tb = 735 °C and (b) residual stresses after the quenching step

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Fig. 5

Schematic of heating arrangement

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Fig. 6

Photograph of the heating arrangement

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Fig. 7

Schematic of the heating and cooling arrangements

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Fig. 8

Thermocouple welded thermal autofrettage specimen

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Fig. 9

Pin configuration of the (a) Arduino microcontroller, (b) MAX6675 module, and (c) relay

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Fig. 10

Assembly of components in the control module

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Fig. 11

A photograph of the complete experimental setup for the heat treatment coupled thermal autofrettage process

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Fig. 12

Variation of microhardness at the (a) outer wall and (b) inner wall

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Fig. 13

The split ring method: (a) saw cut to be made along CC′, (b) releasing of locked bending moment, and (c) the final bend angle

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Fig. 14

Two-dimensional generalized plane strain model for analysis of split ring

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Fig. 15

Opening angle obtained after the splitting in the FEM model of the thermally autofrettaged cylinder

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Fig. 16

Opening angle obtained after the splitting step in FEM model of the heat-treated thermally autofrettaged cylinder

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Fig. 17

Distribution of residual stresses in the thermally autofrettaged cylinder (a) before the split ring test and (b) after the split ring test. Zone I (14–14.46 mm) and zone II (14.46–24 mm) refer to plastic and elastic zones, respectively, just after the loading.

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Fig. 18

Distribution of resdiual stresses in the heat-treated thermally autofrettaged cylinder (a) before the split ring test and (b) after the split ring test. Zone I (14–14.46 mm), zone II (14.46–23.54 mm), and zone III (23.54–24 mm) refer to plastic, elastic and plastic zones, respectively, just after the loading.

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