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Research Papers: Materials and Fabrication

Influence of Oxidation on Estimation of Long-Term Creep Rupture Strength of 2.25Cr–1Mo Steel by Larson–Miller Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Fujio Abe

Structural Materials Division,
National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS),
1-2-1 Sengen,
Tsukuba 304-0047, Japan
e-mail: ABE.Fujio@nims.go.jp

Contributed by the Pressure Vessel and Piping Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received March 11, 2019; final manuscript received June 25, 2019; published online August 2, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Steve J. Hensel.

J. Pressure Vessel Technol 141(6), 061404 (Aug 02, 2019) (12 pages) Paper No: PVT-19-1046; doi: 10.1115/1.4044264 History: Received March 11, 2019; Revised June 25, 2019

The influence of oxidation on the estimation of long-term creep rupture strength is investigated for 2.25% chromium (Cr)–1% molybdenum (Mo) steel specified as JIS STBA 24, JIS SCMV 4 NT, and ASTM A542/A542M by the Larson–Miller method using creep rupture data in the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) Creep Data Sheets at 450–650 °C for up to 313,000 h. The creep rupture data exhibit a change in slope of the stress versus time to rupture curves due to oxidation in air during 600 °C creep tests at 15,000–40,000 h and 650 °C tests at 2000–3500 h for different size specimens, which indicates degradation in creep life by the oxidation. The estimated 100,000 h creep rupture strength using regression analysis is increased by the elimination of long-term data degraded by the oxidation. Several metallurgical factors, such as the initial strength represented by the 0.2% proof stress at the creep test temperature and the concentration of aluminum (Al) impurity, also affect the creep life of the tested steel.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Creep rupture data for JIS STBA 24, JIS SCMV 4 NT, and ASTM A542/A542M at (a) 500 °C, (b) 550 °C, (c) 600 °C and (d) 650 °C

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Fig. 2

Time to rupture of JIS STBA 24, JIS SCMV 4 NT, and ASTM A542/A542M at (a) 500 °C, (b) 550 °C, and (c) 600 °C, as a function of 0.2% proof stress obtained by tensile test at creep rupture test temperature

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Fig. 3

0.2% proof stress and ultimate tensile strength of JIS SCMV 4 NT and ASTM A542/A542M as a function of tempering temperature

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Fig. 4

Time to rupture of JIS STBA 24, JIS SCMV 4 NT, and ASTM A542/A542M at 550 °C, as a function of (a) available nitrogen concentration (NAl) in at % and (b) nitrogen to aluminum ratio N/Al

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Fig. 5

Relationship between nitrogen to aluminum ratio N/Al and available nitrogen concentration (N–Al) for all the heats of the present steels

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Fig. 6

Thickness of oxide scale given by Eq. (2) formed on the creep specimens of JIS SCMV 4 NT during creep in air as a function of time.

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Fig. 7

(a) Net diameter D and (b) S/S0, where S0 is S at t = 0, for the creep specimens with 6 mm and 10 mm diameters, as a function of time

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Fig. 8

Creep rupture data for (a) JIS STBA 24, (b) JIS SCMV 4 NT, and (c) ASTM A542/A542M. The shaded zones represent the creep rupture data after the change in slope of the stress versus time to rupture curves, namely, degraded by oxidation. The solid symbols show the creep rupture data case 1 in Table 1.

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Fig. 9

(a) Second- and (b) third-order regression curves for JIS STBA 24 estimated by using creep rupture data cases 1–3 in Table 1. The solid symbols show the creep rupture data case 1 in Table 1.

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Fig. 10

(a) Second- and (b) third-order regression curves for JIS SCMV 4 NT estimated by using creep rupture data cases 1–3 in Table 1. The solid symbols show the creep rupture data case 1 in Table 1.

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Fig. 11

(a) Second- and (b) third-order regression curves for ASTM A542/A542M estimated by using creep rupture data case 1–3 in Table 1. The solid symbols show the creep rupture data case 1 in Table 1.

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Fig. 12

Temperature dependence of estimated 100,000 h creep rupture strength by using creep rupture data cases 1–3 for (a) JIS STBA 24, (b) JIS SCMV 4 NT, and (c) ASTM A 542/A542M

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Fig. 13

Comparison of creep rupture data case 1 and regression curves among JIS STBA 24, JIS SCMV 4 NT, and ASTM A542/A542M at 500 °C, 550 °C, and 600 °C

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Fig. 14

Temperature dependence of estimated 100,000 h creep rupture strength by using creep rupture data case 1 for JIS STBA 24, JIS SCMV 4 NT, and ASTM A542/A542M

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Fig. 15

Relationship between tr (case 1)/tr (case 2) and tr (case 2) for JIS STBA 24 and JIS SCMV 4 NT at 550 °C

Tables

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