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research-article

ANALYSIS OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN THE TRANSITION ZONE OF TUBE-TO-TUBESHEET JOINTS

[+] Author and Article Information
Hakim A. Bouzid

ASME Fellow, École de Technologie Supéreure, 1100, rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montréal (Québec) H3C 1K3, Canada
hakim.bouzid@etsmtl.ca

Mohammad Pourreza

École de Technologie Supérieure, 1100, rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montréal (Québec) H3C 1K3, Canada
pourrezamh@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4043374 History: Received August 28, 2018; Revised March 21, 2019

Abstract

The rigorous stress analysis of tube-to-tubesheet joints requires a particular attention to the transition zone of the expanded tube because of its impact on joint integrity. This zone is the weakest part of the joint due to the presence of high tensile residual stresses produced during the expansion process, which coupled to in-service loadings and harsh corrosive fluids results in joint failure. In fact, it is often subjected to stress corrosion cracking caused by intergranular attack leading to plant shutdown. Therefore, the evaluation of the residual stresses in this zone is of major interest during the design phase and its accurate assessment is necessary to achieve a reliable joint in service. In this study, an analytical model to evaluate the residual axial and hoop stresses in the transition zone of hydraulically expanded tubes based on an elastic perfectly plastic material behavior has been developed. The model is capable of predicting the stress state when maximum expansion pressure is applied and after its release. Three main regions are identified in the transition zone: the fully plastic region, the partially plastic region and the elastic region. Therefore, various theories have been applied to analyze the stresses and deformations neglecting the partial plastic region because of simplicity. The validation of analytical model is conducted by comparison of the results with those of 3D finite element models of typical joints of different geometries and mechanical properties. The effect strain hardening and reverse yielding of the expansion zone are also investigated.

Copyright (c) 2019 by ASME
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